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Investigation of railway curve squeal using a combination of frequency- and time-domain models

Investigation of railway curve squeal using a combination of frequency- and time-domain models
Investigation of railway curve squeal using a combination of frequency- and time-domain models

Railway curve squeal arises from self-excited vibrations during curving. In this paper, a frequency- and a time-domain approach for curve squeal are compared. In particular, the capability of the frequency-domain model to predict the onset of squeal and the squeal frequencies is studied. In the frequency-domain model, linear stability is investigated through complex eigenvalue analysis. The time-domain model is based on a Green’s function approach and uses a convolution procedure to obtain the system response. To ensure comparability, the same submodels are implemented in both squeal models. The structural flexibility of a rotating wheel is modelled by adopting Eulerian coordinates. To account for the moving wheel–rail contact load, the so-called moving element method is used to model the track. The local friction characteristics in the contact zone are modelled in accordance with Coulomb’s law with a constant friction coefficient. The frictional instability arises due to geometrical coupling. In the time-domain model, Kalker’s non-linear, non-steady state rolling contact model including the algorithms NORM and TANG for normal and tangential contact, respectively, is solved in each time step. In the frequency-domain model, the normal wheel/rail contact is modelled by a linearization of the force-displacement relation obtained with NORM around the quasi-static state and full-slip conditions are considered in the tangential direction. Conditions similar to those of a curve on the Stockholm metro exposed to severe curve squeal are studied with both squeal models. The influence of the wheel-rail friction coefficient and the direction of the resulting creep force on the occurrence of squeal is investigated for vanishing train speed. Results from both models are similar in terms of the instability range in the parameter space and the predicted squeal frequencies.

1612-2909
83-95
Springer
Pieringer, A.
31bd6b3b-3087-49e8-8ab3-e9c79465d7f8
Torstensson, P.T.
4714e40e-0ae3-481b-b78d-6454926c695c
Giner, J.
56fdf097-c864-40de-9665-282522adb35e
Baeza, L.
09dc5565-ad4b-49af-a104-d4b6ad28e1b0
Anderson, David
Gautier, Pierre-Etienne
Iida, Masanobu
Nelson, James T.
Thompson, David J.
Tielkes, Thorsten
Towers, David A.
de Vos, Paul
Nielsen, Jens C.O.
Pieringer, A.
31bd6b3b-3087-49e8-8ab3-e9c79465d7f8
Torstensson, P.T.
4714e40e-0ae3-481b-b78d-6454926c695c
Giner, J.
56fdf097-c864-40de-9665-282522adb35e
Baeza, L.
09dc5565-ad4b-49af-a104-d4b6ad28e1b0
Anderson, David
Gautier, Pierre-Etienne
Iida, Masanobu
Nelson, James T.
Thompson, David J.
Tielkes, Thorsten
Towers, David A.
de Vos, Paul
Nielsen, Jens C.O.

Pieringer, A., Torstensson, P.T., Giner, J. and Baeza, L. (2018) Investigation of railway curve squeal using a combination of frequency- and time-domain models. In, Anderson, David, Gautier, Pierre-Etienne, Iida, Masanobu, Nelson, James T., Thompson, David J., Tielkes, Thorsten, Towers, David A., de Vos, Paul and Nielsen, Jens C.O. (eds.) Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design. (Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-73411-8_5), 139) Cham. Springer, pp. 83-95. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-73411-8_5).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Railway curve squeal arises from self-excited vibrations during curving. In this paper, a frequency- and a time-domain approach for curve squeal are compared. In particular, the capability of the frequency-domain model to predict the onset of squeal and the squeal frequencies is studied. In the frequency-domain model, linear stability is investigated through complex eigenvalue analysis. The time-domain model is based on a Green’s function approach and uses a convolution procedure to obtain the system response. To ensure comparability, the same submodels are implemented in both squeal models. The structural flexibility of a rotating wheel is modelled by adopting Eulerian coordinates. To account for the moving wheel–rail contact load, the so-called moving element method is used to model the track. The local friction characteristics in the contact zone are modelled in accordance with Coulomb’s law with a constant friction coefficient. The frictional instability arises due to geometrical coupling. In the time-domain model, Kalker’s non-linear, non-steady state rolling contact model including the algorithms NORM and TANG for normal and tangential contact, respectively, is solved in each time step. In the frequency-domain model, the normal wheel/rail contact is modelled by a linearization of the force-displacement relation obtained with NORM around the quasi-static state and full-slip conditions are considered in the tangential direction. Conditions similar to those of a curve on the Stockholm metro exposed to severe curve squeal are studied with both squeal models. The influence of the wheel-rail friction coefficient and the direction of the resulting creep force on the occurrence of squeal is investigated for vanishing train speed. Results from both models are similar in terms of the instability range in the parameter space and the predicted squeal frequencies.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 20 May 2018
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421365
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421365
ISSN: 1612-2909
PURE UUID: d7a9c6cb-c48c-44eb-99d4-45041accbb70
ORCID for L. Baeza: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3815-8706

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Date deposited: 06 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:13

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