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The effects of attention and adaptation duration on the motion aftereffect

The effects of attention and adaptation duration on the motion aftereffect
The effects of attention and adaptation duration on the motion aftereffect
The motion aftereffect (MAE) is the perception of illusory motion following extended exposure to a moving stimulus. The MAE has been used to probe the role of attention in motion processing. Many studies report that MAEs are reduced if attention is diverted from the adaptation stimulus (e.g. Chaudhuri, 1990; Rees, Frith, & Lavie, 1997) but others argue that motion adaptation is independent of attention (Morgan, 2011, 2012, 2013). We explore several factors that might modulate the attention-adaptation relationship and therefore explain apparent inconsistencies, namely: (i) adaptation duration, (ii) motion type: translating vs. complex and (iii) response bias. Participants viewed translating (Experiments 1a and 2) or rotating (Experiment 1b) random dot patterns, whilst fixating a central letter stream. During adaptation, participants reported brief changes in the adaptor speed (attention-focused) or the presence of white vowels within the letter stream (attention-diverted). Trials consisted of multiple adaptation-test cycles, and the MAE was measured after each adaptation period. Across experiments, focused attention produced significantly larger MAEs than diverted attention (15% change, Cohen’s d=0.41). Attention affected the MAE asymptote, rather than its accumulation rate, and had larger effects for translational than complex motion. The effect of attention remained evident after controlling for response bias. Our results suggest that attention affects multiple levels of the motion-processing hierarchy: not only higher-level motion processing, as seen with apparent motion, but also low-level motion processing as evidenced by the MAE.
0096-1523
1805-1814
Bartlett, Laura
10ca220e-e90b-4cf6-a056-38f33b12b632
Graf, Erich
1a5123e2-8f05-4084-a6e6-837dcfc66209
Adams, Wendy
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688
Bartlett, Laura
10ca220e-e90b-4cf6-a056-38f33b12b632
Graf, Erich
1a5123e2-8f05-4084-a6e6-837dcfc66209
Adams, Wendy
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688

Bartlett, Laura, Graf, Erich and Adams, Wendy (2018) The effects of attention and adaptation duration on the motion aftereffect. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 44 (11), 1805-1814. (doi:10.1037/xhp0000572).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The motion aftereffect (MAE) is the perception of illusory motion following extended exposure to a moving stimulus. The MAE has been used to probe the role of attention in motion processing. Many studies report that MAEs are reduced if attention is diverted from the adaptation stimulus (e.g. Chaudhuri, 1990; Rees, Frith, & Lavie, 1997) but others argue that motion adaptation is independent of attention (Morgan, 2011, 2012, 2013). We explore several factors that might modulate the attention-adaptation relationship and therefore explain apparent inconsistencies, namely: (i) adaptation duration, (ii) motion type: translating vs. complex and (iii) response bias. Participants viewed translating (Experiments 1a and 2) or rotating (Experiment 1b) random dot patterns, whilst fixating a central letter stream. During adaptation, participants reported brief changes in the adaptor speed (attention-focused) or the presence of white vowels within the letter stream (attention-diverted). Trials consisted of multiple adaptation-test cycles, and the MAE was measured after each adaptation period. Across experiments, focused attention produced significantly larger MAEs than diverted attention (15% change, Cohen’s d=0.41). Attention affected the MAE asymptote, rather than its accumulation rate, and had larger effects for translational than complex motion. The effect of attention remained evident after controlling for response bias. Our results suggest that attention affects multiple levels of the motion-processing hierarchy: not only higher-level motion processing, as seen with apparent motion, but also low-level motion processing as evidenced by the MAE.

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BartlettGrafAdams2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 August 2018
Published date: November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421387
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421387
ISSN: 0096-1523
PURE UUID: 012240d7-7031-4734-95fe-65e87cc562a1
ORCID for Erich Graf: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3162-4233
ORCID for Wendy Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5832-1056

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Date deposited: 07 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Laura Bartlett
Author: Erich Graf ORCID iD
Author: Wendy Adams ORCID iD

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