The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Biological and clinical aspects of an olive oil-based lipid emulsion – a review

Biological and clinical aspects of an olive oil-based lipid emulsion – a review
Biological and clinical aspects of an olive oil-based lipid emulsion – a review
Intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs) have been an integral component of parenteral nutrition for more than 50 years. Numerous formulations are available and are based on vegetable (soybean, olive, coconut) and animal (fish) oils. Therefore, each of these formulations has a unique fatty acid composition that offers both benefits and limitations. As clinical experience and our understanding of the effects of fatty acids on various physiological processes has grown, there is evidence to suggest that some ILEs may have benefits compared with others. Current evidence suggests that olive oil-based ILE may preserve immune, hepatobiliary, and endothelial cell function, and may reduce lipid peroxidation and plasma lipid levels. There is good evidence from a large randomized controlled study to support a benefit of olive oil-based ILE over soybean oil-based ILE on reducing infections in critically ill patients. At present there is limited evidence to demonstrate a benefit of olive oil-based ILE over other ILEs on glucose metabolism, and few data exist to demonstrate a benefit on clinical outcomes such as hospital or intensive care unit stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, or mortality. We review the current research and clinical evidence supporting the potential positive biological and clinical aspects of olive oil-based ILE and conclude that olive oil-based ILE is well tolerated and provides effective nutritional support to various PN-requiring patient populations. Olive oil-based ILE appears to support the innate immune system, is associated with fewer infections, induces less lipid peroxidation, and is not associated with increased hepatobiliary or lipid disturbances. These data would suggest that olive oil-based ILE is a valuable option in various PN-requiring patient populations
CAI, Wei
1b0e6012-1392-4e54-94d9-fd1691d6bfd9
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
CURY-BOAVENTURA, Maria F.
e84fc4c2-47f6-4e97-b142-e9410baca79c
DE WAELE, Elisabeth
c728eef9-d8cf-457b-82a5-3b54c7082b78
JAKUBOWSKI, Julie
f0f51a97-756a-4878-b64e-3828ec1bb378
ZALOGA, Gary
059bb81c-e43e-4efe-ba2f-d2c7f307aef0
CAI, Wei
1b0e6012-1392-4e54-94d9-fd1691d6bfd9
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
CURY-BOAVENTURA, Maria F.
e84fc4c2-47f6-4e97-b142-e9410baca79c
DE WAELE, Elisabeth
c728eef9-d8cf-457b-82a5-3b54c7082b78
JAKUBOWSKI, Julie
f0f51a97-756a-4878-b64e-3828ec1bb378
ZALOGA, Gary
059bb81c-e43e-4efe-ba2f-d2c7f307aef0

CAI, Wei, Calder, Philip, CURY-BOAVENTURA, Maria F., DE WAELE, Elisabeth, JAKUBOWSKI, Julie and ZALOGA, Gary (2018) Biological and clinical aspects of an olive oil-based lipid emulsion – a review. Nutrients, 10 (6). (doi:10.3390/nu10060776).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs) have been an integral component of parenteral nutrition for more than 50 years. Numerous formulations are available and are based on vegetable (soybean, olive, coconut) and animal (fish) oils. Therefore, each of these formulations has a unique fatty acid composition that offers both benefits and limitations. As clinical experience and our understanding of the effects of fatty acids on various physiological processes has grown, there is evidence to suggest that some ILEs may have benefits compared with others. Current evidence suggests that olive oil-based ILE may preserve immune, hepatobiliary, and endothelial cell function, and may reduce lipid peroxidation and plasma lipid levels. There is good evidence from a large randomized controlled study to support a benefit of olive oil-based ILE over soybean oil-based ILE on reducing infections in critically ill patients. At present there is limited evidence to demonstrate a benefit of olive oil-based ILE over other ILEs on glucose metabolism, and few data exist to demonstrate a benefit on clinical outcomes such as hospital or intensive care unit stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, or mortality. We review the current research and clinical evidence supporting the potential positive biological and clinical aspects of olive oil-based ILE and conclude that olive oil-based ILE is well tolerated and provides effective nutritional support to various PN-requiring patient populations. Olive oil-based ILE appears to support the innate immune system, is associated with fewer infections, induces less lipid peroxidation, and is not associated with increased hepatobiliary or lipid disturbances. These data would suggest that olive oil-based ILE is a valuable option in various PN-requiring patient populations

Text
Manuscript ID nutrients-299794_Cai et al_Revised Manuscript_7Jun18_Final - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Request a copy
Text
nutrients-10-00776 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 June 2018
Published date: June 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421410
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421410
PURE UUID: e9b2244f-d47a-4e5c-b45e-6e142a40c366

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:24

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×