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Heat challenges can enhance population tolerance to thermal stress in mussels: a potential mechanism by which ship transport can increase species invasiveness

Heat challenges can enhance population tolerance to thermal stress in mussels: a potential mechanism by which ship transport can increase species invasiveness
Heat challenges can enhance population tolerance to thermal stress in mussels: a potential mechanism by which ship transport can increase species invasiveness

It is unclear whether transport by human vectors can increase the robustness of translocated populations and thereby enhance their invasiveness. To test this concept, we investigated the effect of heat stress on the tolerance of mussel populations towards a second stress event of the same kind. The heat challenges we mimicked can be faced by marine invertebrates that are transported through regions with high sea surface temperatures on ship hulls or in ballast water tanks. The study included 5 mussel species that were collected at sites in Brazil, Chile, Finland, Germany (Baltic Sea) and Portugal. In parallel laboratory experiments, monospecific groups of individuals were exposed to heat challenges that caused 60–83% mortality in the experimental groups within 15–28 days. The surviving individuals were exposed to a second stress event of the same kind, while their survival was then compared to the robustness of conspecifics that had not been exposed to elevated temperatures before. We observed that thermal tolerance was significantly enhanced by previous heat stress experience in case of Semimytilus algosus from Chile and in case of Mytilus edulis from Germany. Our results suggest that heat challenges, which marine invertebrates experience during transport, can enhance stress tolerance in founder populations of these species in their non-native range by potentially increasing the frequency of genetically adapted genotypes. This points at the necessity to learn more about selection acting on organisms during human-mediated transport—in the aquatic but also in the terrestrial environment.

Heat, Mytilids, Selection, Stress tolerance, Survival, Transport
1387-3547
1-16
Lenz, Mark
d9e25ed4-5ecf-4524-b3b2-895acfa71998
Ahmed, Yasser
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Canning-Clode, João
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Díaz, Eliecer
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Eichhorn, Sandra
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Fabritzek, Armin G.
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da Gama, Bernardo A.P.
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Garcia, Marie
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von Juterzenka, Karen
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Kraufvelin, Patrik
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Machura, Susanne
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Oberschelp, Lisa
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Paiva, Filipa
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Penna, Miguel A.
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Ribeiro, Felipe V.
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Thiel, Martin
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Wohlgemuth, Daniel
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Zamani, Neviaty P.
b547c7ea-c3b2-409b-b6f2-7e3937fd966d
Wahl, Martin
92446bc5-ebc5-4b96-b650-edc9288c1ace
Lenz, Mark
d9e25ed4-5ecf-4524-b3b2-895acfa71998
Ahmed, Yasser
e2f9e878-d78a-45d8-8a89-86ce0c9725f6
Canning-Clode, João
38e681af-188e-41c5-8a99-17ea80cbc082
Díaz, Eliecer
3e5187ef-80ae-4f05-8e37-25cb235c449d
Eichhorn, Sandra
04877e87-2a78-4b05-8f56-c0241d5a593e
Fabritzek, Armin G.
765e64ab-9b1f-4eaf-9dd2-781397cc99d7
da Gama, Bernardo A.P.
85a11040-77eb-4e36-8050-85a38e4daa04
Garcia, Marie
75cb8a99-d97d-40f3-a141-706c4c4db64e
von Juterzenka, Karen
ad4f333c-7e71-438c-afc3-5bfb872de330
Kraufvelin, Patrik
3ec6937e-9b88-459d-91d6-b6e637890006
Machura, Susanne
63bf8d3b-1ee5-458c-9d28-7d3d17902a70
Oberschelp, Lisa
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Paiva, Filipa
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Penna, Miguel A.
60af5282-11a3-4c7c-9fb4-2e7a056ecc8f
Ribeiro, Felipe V.
1dcd2a5b-b312-439c-aaf4-f3198ff47285
Thiel, Martin
c967c7f2-5c57-446d-8011-84da616cb0a1
Wohlgemuth, Daniel
ec239ea9-8600-4930-af70-7feb22b78004
Zamani, Neviaty P.
b547c7ea-c3b2-409b-b6f2-7e3937fd966d
Wahl, Martin
92446bc5-ebc5-4b96-b650-edc9288c1ace

Lenz, Mark, Ahmed, Yasser, Canning-Clode, João, Díaz, Eliecer, Eichhorn, Sandra, Fabritzek, Armin G., da Gama, Bernardo A.P., Garcia, Marie, von Juterzenka, Karen, Kraufvelin, Patrik, Machura, Susanne, Oberschelp, Lisa, Paiva, Filipa, Penna, Miguel A., Ribeiro, Felipe V., Thiel, Martin, Wohlgemuth, Daniel, Zamani, Neviaty P. and Wahl, Martin (2018) Heat challenges can enhance population tolerance to thermal stress in mussels: a potential mechanism by which ship transport can increase species invasiveness. Biological Invasions, 1-16. (doi:10.1007/s10530-018-1762-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It is unclear whether transport by human vectors can increase the robustness of translocated populations and thereby enhance their invasiveness. To test this concept, we investigated the effect of heat stress on the tolerance of mussel populations towards a second stress event of the same kind. The heat challenges we mimicked can be faced by marine invertebrates that are transported through regions with high sea surface temperatures on ship hulls or in ballast water tanks. The study included 5 mussel species that were collected at sites in Brazil, Chile, Finland, Germany (Baltic Sea) and Portugal. In parallel laboratory experiments, monospecific groups of individuals were exposed to heat challenges that caused 60–83% mortality in the experimental groups within 15–28 days. The surviving individuals were exposed to a second stress event of the same kind, while their survival was then compared to the robustness of conspecifics that had not been exposed to elevated temperatures before. We observed that thermal tolerance was significantly enhanced by previous heat stress experience in case of Semimytilus algosus from Chile and in case of Mytilus edulis from Germany. Our results suggest that heat challenges, which marine invertebrates experience during transport, can enhance stress tolerance in founder populations of these species in their non-native range by potentially increasing the frequency of genetically adapted genotypes. This points at the necessity to learn more about selection acting on organisms during human-mediated transport—in the aquatic but also in the terrestrial environment.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 May 2018
Keywords: Heat, Mytilids, Selection, Stress tolerance, Survival, Transport

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421443
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421443
ISSN: 1387-3547
PURE UUID: c76c33d0-f26d-4bc4-9144-7abcc4c98988

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Date deposited: 12 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Mar 2022 17:39

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Contributors

Author: Mark Lenz
Author: Yasser Ahmed
Author: João Canning-Clode
Author: Eliecer Díaz
Author: Sandra Eichhorn
Author: Armin G. Fabritzek
Author: Bernardo A.P. da Gama
Author: Marie Garcia
Author: Karen von Juterzenka
Author: Patrik Kraufvelin
Author: Susanne Machura
Author: Lisa Oberschelp
Author: Filipa Paiva
Author: Miguel A. Penna
Author: Felipe V. Ribeiro
Author: Martin Thiel
Author: Daniel Wohlgemuth
Author: Neviaty P. Zamani
Author: Martin Wahl

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