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Introduced species that overcome life history tradeoffs can cause native extinctions

Introduced species that overcome life history tradeoffs can cause native extinctions
Introduced species that overcome life history tradeoffs can cause native extinctions
Introduced species threaten native biodiversity, but whether exotic species can competitively displace native species remains contested. Building on theory that predicts multi-species coexistence based on a competition-colonisation tradeoff, we derive a mechanistic basis by which human-mediated species invasions could cause extinctions through competitive displacement. In contrast to past invasions, humans principally introduce modern invaders, repeatedly and in large quantities, and in ways that can facilitate release from enemies and competitors. Associated increases in exotic species’ propagule rain, survival and competitive ability could enable some introduced species to overcome the tradeoffs that constrain all other species. Using evidence from metacommunity models, we show how species introductions could disrupt species coexistence, generating extinction debts, especially when combined with other forms of anthropogenic environmental change. Even though competing species have typically coexisted following past biogeographic migrations, the multiplicity and interactive impacts of today’s threats could change some exotic species into agents of extinction.
1-7
Catford, Jane
c80a4529-b7cb-4d36-aba8-f38de01ce729
Bode, Michael
97aa44df-3bb0-477d-b0e3-3d10c3fda71d
Tilman, David
f7f46647-8529-4f1f-bce0-c6a848e1d0c5
Catford, Jane
c80a4529-b7cb-4d36-aba8-f38de01ce729
Bode, Michael
97aa44df-3bb0-477d-b0e3-3d10c3fda71d
Tilman, David
f7f46647-8529-4f1f-bce0-c6a848e1d0c5

Catford, Jane, Bode, Michael and Tilman, David (2018) Introduced species that overcome life history tradeoffs can cause native extinctions. Nature Communications, 9, 1-7. (doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04491-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduced species threaten native biodiversity, but whether exotic species can competitively displace native species remains contested. Building on theory that predicts multi-species coexistence based on a competition-colonisation tradeoff, we derive a mechanistic basis by which human-mediated species invasions could cause extinctions through competitive displacement. In contrast to past invasions, humans principally introduce modern invaders, repeatedly and in large quantities, and in ways that can facilitate release from enemies and competitors. Associated increases in exotic species’ propagule rain, survival and competitive ability could enable some introduced species to overcome the tradeoffs that constrain all other species. Using evidence from metacommunity models, we show how species introductions could disrupt species coexistence, generating extinction debts, especially when combined with other forms of anthropogenic environmental change. Even though competing species have typically coexisted following past biogeographic migrations, the multiplicity and interactive impacts of today’s threats could change some exotic species into agents of extinction.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421454
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421454
PURE UUID: ab8dc5ed-6b1a-40fc-9f7a-c7b810977698
ORCID for Jane Catford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0582-5960

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:31

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