The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Development of a high current heaterless hollow cathode

Development of a high current heaterless hollow cathode
Development of a high current heaterless hollow cathode
Higher power in-space propulsion systems are increasingly been developed and utilised due to payload increases and mission demands. This requires higher current cathodes to match this demand, as such cathodes are increasingly adopting lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) emitters due to the higher current density operation capabilities. However, LaB6 cathodes operate at higher temperatures compared with traditional barium oxide cathodes, due to the material’s relatively higher work function. Hence, this poses higher challenges to the heater technologies, which raise convention HCs to thermionic temperature. Here we present the development of a heaterless hollow cathode (HHC) system, which self-heats within only tens of seconds before nominal operation, and enables currents up to 30 A. Such that the system effectively removes the burden of the heater subcomponent. Within this work, the breakdown, cold (heating) discharge and nominal performance of the HHC have been characterised. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy is utilised to assess the relative erosion rates.
high current, heaterless, Hollow cathode discharge, thermionic emission, Lab6
1-8
Daykin-Iliopoulos, Alexander
0caedbac-93a0-45c9-ae31-02f6c70ab8c0
Golosnoy, Igor O.
40603f91-7488-49ea-830f-24dd930573d1
Gabriel, Stephen
ac76976d-74fd-40a0-808d-c9f68a38f259
Daykin-Iliopoulos, Alexander
0caedbac-93a0-45c9-ae31-02f6c70ab8c0
Golosnoy, Igor O.
40603f91-7488-49ea-830f-24dd930573d1
Gabriel, Stephen
ac76976d-74fd-40a0-808d-c9f68a38f259

Daykin-Iliopoulos, Alexander, Golosnoy, Igor O. and Gabriel, Stephen (2018) Development of a high current heaterless hollow cathode. Space Propulsion 2018, Spain. 13 - 18 May 2018. pp. 1-8 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Higher power in-space propulsion systems are increasingly been developed and utilised due to payload increases and mission demands. This requires higher current cathodes to match this demand, as such cathodes are increasingly adopting lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) emitters due to the higher current density operation capabilities. However, LaB6 cathodes operate at higher temperatures compared with traditional barium oxide cathodes, due to the material’s relatively higher work function. Hence, this poses higher challenges to the heater technologies, which raise convention HCs to thermionic temperature. Here we present the development of a heaterless hollow cathode (HHC) system, which self-heats within only tens of seconds before nominal operation, and enables currents up to 30 A. Such that the system effectively removes the burden of the heater subcomponent. Within this work, the breakdown, cold (heating) discharge and nominal performance of the HHC have been characterised. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy is utilised to assess the relative erosion rates.

Text
SP2018_00286_A Daykin-Iliopoulos - Version of Record
Restricted to Registered users only
Download (1MB)
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 18 May 2018
Venue - Dates: Space Propulsion 2018, Spain, 2018-05-13 - 2018-05-18
Keywords: high current, heaterless, Hollow cathode discharge, thermionic emission, Lab6

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421547
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421547
PURE UUID: a897f077-97d8-4ad4-a4a6-904cdaabe690

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 12 Aug 2020 16:37

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×