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Understanding the health and wellbeing challenges of the foodbanking system: a qualitative study of food bank users, providers and referrers in London

Understanding the health and wellbeing challenges of the foodbanking system: a qualitative study of food bank users, providers and referrers in London
Understanding the health and wellbeing challenges of the foodbanking system: a qualitative study of food bank users, providers and referrers in London
In the UK, food poverty has been associated with conditions such as obesity, malnutrition, hypertension, iron deficiency, and impaired liver function. Food banks, the primary response to food poverty on the ground, typically rely on community referral and distribution systems that involve health and social care professionals and local authority public health teams. The perspectives of these key stakeholders remain underexplored. This paper reports on a qualitative study of the health and wellbeing challenges of food poverty and food banking in London. An ethnographic investigation of food bank staff and users was carried out alongside a series of healthcare stakeholder interviews. A total of 42 participants were interviewed. A Critical Grounded Theory (CGT) analysis revealed that contemporary lived experiences of food poverty are embedded within and symptomatic of extreme marginalisation, which in turn impacts upon health. Specifically, food poverty was conceptualised by participants to: firstly, be a barrier to providing adequate care and nutrition for young children; secondly, be exacerbated by lack of access to adequate fresh food, food storage and cooking facilities; and thirdly, amplify existing health and social problems. Further investigation of the local government structures and professional roles that both rely upon and serve to further embed the food banking system is necessary in order to understand the politics of changing welfare landscapes.
0277-9536
Thompson, Claire
de2340af-39c9-4a63-adfd-9ef99f0aeed5
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Cummins, Steven
e09991cf-4443-4626-b595-987e62da5f8b
Thompson, Claire
de2340af-39c9-4a63-adfd-9ef99f0aeed5
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Cummins, Steven
e09991cf-4443-4626-b595-987e62da5f8b

Thompson, Claire, Smith, Dianna and Cummins, Steven (2018) Understanding the health and wellbeing challenges of the foodbanking system: a qualitative study of food bank users, providers and referrers in London. Social Science & Medicine. (doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.05.030).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the UK, food poverty has been associated with conditions such as obesity, malnutrition, hypertension, iron deficiency, and impaired liver function. Food banks, the primary response to food poverty on the ground, typically rely on community referral and distribution systems that involve health and social care professionals and local authority public health teams. The perspectives of these key stakeholders remain underexplored. This paper reports on a qualitative study of the health and wellbeing challenges of food poverty and food banking in London. An ethnographic investigation of food bank staff and users was carried out alongside a series of healthcare stakeholder interviews. A total of 42 participants were interviewed. A Critical Grounded Theory (CGT) analysis revealed that contemporary lived experiences of food poverty are embedded within and symptomatic of extreme marginalisation, which in turn impacts upon health. Specifically, food poverty was conceptualised by participants to: firstly, be a barrier to providing adequate care and nutrition for young children; secondly, be exacerbated by lack of access to adequate fresh food, food storage and cooking facilities; and thirdly, amplify existing health and social problems. Further investigation of the local government structures and professional roles that both rely upon and serve to further embed the food banking system is necessary in order to understand the politics of changing welfare landscapes.

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1-s2.0-S0277953618302739-main - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 15 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421636
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421636
ISSN: 0277-9536
PURE UUID: e17ce72b-bb71-4cbb-adac-9d99e4c041dc

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Date deposited: 18 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 16 May 2019 04:01

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