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IGR J17329-2731: The birth of a symbiotic X-ray binary

IGR J17329-2731: The birth of a symbiotic X-ray binary
IGR J17329-2731: The birth of a symbiotic X-ray binary
We report on the results of the multiwavelength campaign carried out after the discovery of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17329-2731. The optical data collected with the SOAR telescope allowed us to identify the donor star in this system as a late M giant at a distance of 2.7-1.2+3.4 kpc. The data collected quasi-simultaneously with XMM–Newton and NuSTAR showed the presence of a modulation with a period of 6680 ± 3 s in the X-ray light curves of the source. This unveils that the compact object hosted in this system is a slowly rotating neutron star. The broadband X-ray spectrum showed the presence of a strong absorption (≫1023 cm−2) and prominent emission lines at 6.4 keV, and 7.1 keV. These features are usually found in wind-fed systems, in which the emission lines result from the fluorescence of the X-rays from the accreting compact object on the surrounding stellar wind. The presence of a strong absorption line around ~21 keV in the spectrum suggests a cyclotron origin, thus allowing us to estimate the neutron star magnetic field as ~2.4 × 1012 G. All evidencethus suggests IGR J17329-2731 is a symbiotic X-ray binary. As no X-ray emission was ever observed from the location of IGR J17329-2731 by INTEGRAL (or other X-ray facilities) during the past 15 yr in orbit and considering that symbiotic X-ray binaries are known to be variable but persistent X-ray sources, we concluded that INTEGRAL caught the first detectable X-ray emission from IGR J17329-2731 when the source shined as a symbiotic X-ray binary. The Swift XRT monitoring performed up to ~3 months after the discovery of the source, showed that it maintained a relatively stable X-ray flux and spectral properties.
0004-6361
Bozzo, E.
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Bahramian, A.
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Ferrigno, C.
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Sanna, A.
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Strader, J.
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Lewis, F
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Russell, D.M.
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Di Salvo, T.
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Burderi, L.
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Riggio, A.
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Papitto, A.
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Gandhi, Poshak
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Romano, P.
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Bozzo, E.
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Bahramian, A.
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Ferrigno, C.
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Sanna, A.
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Strader, J.
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Lewis, F
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Russell, D.M.
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Di Salvo, T.
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Burderi, L.
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Riggio, A.
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Papitto, A.
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Gandhi, Poshak
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Romano, P.
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Bozzo, E., Bahramian, A., Ferrigno, C., Sanna, A., Strader, J., Lewis, F, Russell, D.M., Di Salvo, T., Burderi, L., Riggio, A., Papitto, A., Gandhi, Poshak and Romano, P. (2018) IGR J17329-2731: The birth of a symbiotic X-ray binary. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 613, [A22]. (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201832588).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We report on the results of the multiwavelength campaign carried out after the discovery of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17329-2731. The optical data collected with the SOAR telescope allowed us to identify the donor star in this system as a late M giant at a distance of 2.7-1.2+3.4 kpc. The data collected quasi-simultaneously with XMM–Newton and NuSTAR showed the presence of a modulation with a period of 6680 ± 3 s in the X-ray light curves of the source. This unveils that the compact object hosted in this system is a slowly rotating neutron star. The broadband X-ray spectrum showed the presence of a strong absorption (≫1023 cm−2) and prominent emission lines at 6.4 keV, and 7.1 keV. These features are usually found in wind-fed systems, in which the emission lines result from the fluorescence of the X-rays from the accreting compact object on the surrounding stellar wind. The presence of a strong absorption line around ~21 keV in the spectrum suggests a cyclotron origin, thus allowing us to estimate the neutron star magnetic field as ~2.4 × 1012 G. All evidencethus suggests IGR J17329-2731 is a symbiotic X-ray binary. As no X-ray emission was ever observed from the location of IGR J17329-2731 by INTEGRAL (or other X-ray facilities) during the past 15 yr in orbit and considering that symbiotic X-ray binaries are known to be variable but persistent X-ray sources, we concluded that INTEGRAL caught the first detectable X-ray emission from IGR J17329-2731 when the source shined as a symbiotic X-ray binary. The Swift XRT monitoring performed up to ~3 months after the discovery of the source, showed that it maintained a relatively stable X-ray flux and spectral properties.

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IGR J17329-2731: The birth of a symbiotic X-ray binary - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 15 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421684
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421684
ISSN: 0004-6361
PURE UUID: 243df2c0-9d5a-4881-81bd-cc5d70437670
ORCID for Poshak Gandhi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3105-2615

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Date deposited: 21 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:47

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