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Rolling mass energy harvester for very low frequency of input vibrations

Rolling mass energy harvester for very low frequency of input vibrations
Rolling mass energy harvester for very low frequency of input vibrations

This paper presents a novel design of a nonlinear kinetic energy harvester for very low excitation frequencies below 10 Hz. The design is based on a proof mass, rolling in a circular cavity in a Tusi couple configuration. This allows for an unconstrained displacement of the proof mass while maintaining the option of keeping the energy transduction element engaged during the whole cycle and thus reducing the required number of transduction elements. Both the presented model and the fabricated prototype of the device employ electromagnetic induction to harvest energy from low frequency and low magnitude vibrations that are typically associated with human movements. The prototype demonstrated an average power of 5.1 mW from a 1.3 g periodic acceleration waveform at 2.78 Hz. The highest simulated normalized power density reaches up to 230 μW/g2/cm3, but this depends heavily on the excitation conditions.

Electromagnetic induction, Energy harvesting, Human motion, Low frequency, Nonlinear systems, Tusi couple
0888-3270
Smilek, Jan
2713efa0-b026-40e6-af48-63d281b61953
Hadas, Zdenek
77a66d0e-e9ba-4eb0-bae0-b86872171c87
Vetiska, Jan
e3c2bae4-304d-45d2-89e5-843b291ea115
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Smilek, Jan
2713efa0-b026-40e6-af48-63d281b61953
Hadas, Zdenek
77a66d0e-e9ba-4eb0-bae0-b86872171c87
Vetiska, Jan
e3c2bae4-304d-45d2-89e5-843b291ea115
Beeby, Steve
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d

Smilek, Jan, Hadas, Zdenek, Vetiska, Jan and Beeby, Steve (2018) Rolling mass energy harvester for very low frequency of input vibrations. Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing. (doi:10.1016/j.ymssp.2018.05.062).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper presents a novel design of a nonlinear kinetic energy harvester for very low excitation frequencies below 10 Hz. The design is based on a proof mass, rolling in a circular cavity in a Tusi couple configuration. This allows for an unconstrained displacement of the proof mass while maintaining the option of keeping the energy transduction element engaged during the whole cycle and thus reducing the required number of transduction elements. Both the presented model and the fabricated prototype of the device employ electromagnetic induction to harvest energy from low frequency and low magnitude vibrations that are typically associated with human movements. The prototype demonstrated an average power of 5.1 mW from a 1.3 g periodic acceleration waveform at 2.78 Hz. The highest simulated normalized power density reaches up to 230 μW/g2/cm3, but this depends heavily on the excitation conditions.

Text Rolling mass energy harvester for very low frequency of input vibrations - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 6 June 2019.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 June 2018
Keywords: Electromagnetic induction, Energy harvesting, Human motion, Low frequency, Nonlinear systems, Tusi couple

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421699
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421699
ISSN: 0888-3270
PURE UUID: 166e20f8-439f-4fc0-8d60-0b8d0688dbf3
ORCID for Steve Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Jun 2018 00:36

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