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Metabolic rates are significantly lower in abyssal Holothuroidea than in shallow-water Holothuroidea

Metabolic rates are significantly lower in abyssal Holothuroidea than in shallow-water Holothuroidea
Metabolic rates are significantly lower in abyssal Holothuroidea than in shallow-water Holothuroidea
Recent analyses of metabolic rates in fishes, echinoderms, crustaceans and cephalopods have concluded that bathymetric declines in temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate do not result from resource-limitation (e.g. oxygen or food/chemical energy), decreasing temperature or increasing hydrostatic pressure. Instead, based on contrasting bathymetric patterns reported in the metabolic rates of visual and non-visual taxa, declining metabolic rate with depth is proposed to result from relaxation of selection for high locomotory capacity in visual predators as light diminishes. Here, we present metabolic rates of Holothuroidea, a non-visual benthic and benthopelagic echinoderm class, determined in situ at abyssal depths (greater than 4000 m depth). Mean temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate did not differ significantly between shallow-water (less than 200 m depth) and bathyal (200–4000 m depth) holothurians, but was significantly lower in abyssal (greater than 4000 m depth) holothurians than in shallow-water holothurians. These results support the dominance of the visual interactions hypothesis at bathyal depths, but indicate that ecological or evolutionary pressures other than biotic visual interactions contribute to bathymetric variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Multiple nonlinear regression assuming power or exponential models indicates that in situ hydrostatic pressure and/or food/chemical energy availability are responsible for variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Consequently, these results have implications for modelling deep-sea energetics and processes.
1-13
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Stratmann, Tanja
3f96a898-312d-4dff-9ad0-171d22235ce9
Sweetman, Andrew
5304cde0-8e83-4a68-8249-fa2d9e70d8bb
Van Oevelen, Dick
7a75c2d2-d59c-4f35-a3da-8ff31d375b61
Jones, Daniel O. B.
44fc07b3-5fb7-4bf5-9cec-78c78022613a
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Stratmann, Tanja
3f96a898-312d-4dff-9ad0-171d22235ce9
Sweetman, Andrew
5304cde0-8e83-4a68-8249-fa2d9e70d8bb
Van Oevelen, Dick
7a75c2d2-d59c-4f35-a3da-8ff31d375b61
Jones, Daniel O. B.
44fc07b3-5fb7-4bf5-9cec-78c78022613a

Brown, Alastair, Hauton, Chris, Stratmann, Tanja, Sweetman, Andrew, Van Oevelen, Dick and Jones, Daniel O. B. (2018) Metabolic rates are significantly lower in abyssal Holothuroidea than in shallow-water Holothuroidea. Royal Society Open Science, 5 (5), 1-13. (doi:10.1098/rsos.172162).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent analyses of metabolic rates in fishes, echinoderms, crustaceans and cephalopods have concluded that bathymetric declines in temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate do not result from resource-limitation (e.g. oxygen or food/chemical energy), decreasing temperature or increasing hydrostatic pressure. Instead, based on contrasting bathymetric patterns reported in the metabolic rates of visual and non-visual taxa, declining metabolic rate with depth is proposed to result from relaxation of selection for high locomotory capacity in visual predators as light diminishes. Here, we present metabolic rates of Holothuroidea, a non-visual benthic and benthopelagic echinoderm class, determined in situ at abyssal depths (greater than 4000 m depth). Mean temperature- and mass-normalized metabolic rate did not differ significantly between shallow-water (less than 200 m depth) and bathyal (200–4000 m depth) holothurians, but was significantly lower in abyssal (greater than 4000 m depth) holothurians than in shallow-water holothurians. These results support the dominance of the visual interactions hypothesis at bathyal depths, but indicate that ecological or evolutionary pressures other than biotic visual interactions contribute to bathymetric variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Multiple nonlinear regression assuming power or exponential models indicates that in situ hydrostatic pressure and/or food/chemical energy availability are responsible for variation in holothurian metabolic rates. Consequently, these results have implications for modelling deep-sea energetics and processes.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 April 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421787
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421787
PURE UUID: 5a9a80a4-ea59-4aa8-a345-1e552f9ba6b1
ORCID for Chris Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226

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Date deposited: 27 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:53

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