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Improving the management of severe acute malnutrition among infants and children through capacity building: findings from an evaluation study with malnutrition eLearning

Improving the management of severe acute malnutrition among infants and children through capacity building: findings from an evaluation study with malnutrition eLearning
Improving the management of severe acute malnutrition among infants and children through capacity building: findings from an evaluation study with malnutrition eLearning
Background and objectives: The University of Southampton and International Malnutrition Task Force developed Malnutrition eLearning to reduce child mortality by Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) through training health professionals globally. Since made available in 2010, over 14,000 from 100+ countries used the course. To investigate its effectiveness, a 2-year evaluation study was conducted from 2015, face-to-face in Ghana and Central America (CA), and online in other countries.Methods: Using a mixed method approach, the study explored if and how Malnutrition eLearning supported knowledge gain and behavioural change (application of knowledge in clinical practice), and resulting clinical outcomes in the management of SAM. Assessments, questionnaires and interviews/focus groups were conducted with individual in-service and pre-service participants pre- and post-training, and 12 months of medical records data collection, observations and hospital personnel interviews were carried out from participating healthcare institutions.Results: Total 1,261 health professionals (Ghana:915, CA:142, other countries:201), and 10 hospitals and 2 community health centres in Ghana and 2 hospitals in CA participated in the study. 3,955 (pre:01/08/2014–31/07/2015) and 3,737 (post:01/08/2015– 31/07/2016) medical records of children (0-60 months) were collected from the hospitals, and summary data on malnutrition cases (pre:76, post:67) from community health centres. Individual participants scored significantly higher in the post assessment (mean difference(SD): 14.0(12.5), 95%CI(12.7, 15.2), p<0.001). 87% of in-service health professionals (102/117) applied their knowledge and changed clinical practice in screening, assessment, diagnosis and management of SAM. This group demonstrated retained knowledge 6-month after the training (mean difference from pre-assessment(SD): 12.7(11.7), 95%CI(10.4, 15.0),p<0.001). Significant increases (p<0.001) in recording malnutrition-markers, i.e. length/height and weight-for-length/ height z-score, and diagnosed SAM cases (pre: 491(12.4%), post: 810(21.7%)) were observed. Mortality by SAM was declined from 26(5.9%) to 14(1.9%) (p<0.001). The community centres initiated the management of SAM (pre:0/32, post:7/21).Conclusions: The results suggest that Malnutrition eLearning is effective in training the WHO guideline on the management of SAM. After a 2-day self-directed training with Malnutrition eLearning, the participants not only gained knowledge but were also able to apply the knowledge in their clinical practice, leading to significant impacts on clinical outcomes.Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the UK Department for International Development Nutrition Embedding Evaluation Programme, managed by PATH.
0250-6807
suppl 2
360
Karger
Choi, Sunhea
1d0e766d-38d5-4d01-aea7-639c4334334f
Yuen, Ho
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Annan, Reginald
c83b8cdc-5ad7-40d3-9c99-917d95fcf9e6
Monroy-Valle, Michele
32c49d3d-9cc4-4bbb-b1de-8425a8875cf6
Pulman, Andrew J
ff04044d-ef72-4ccd-8eac-287c3550e1cd
Aduku, Nana Esi
285aa641-315d-46f3-b6c1-79234f4379bd
Kyei-boateng, Samuel
f6234c57-a23d-47c8-b8e7-9f0b13a220cc
Pickup, Trevor M
f7767181-5760-48b8-aaa0-1b3a2c5acb40
Choi, Sunhea
1d0e766d-38d5-4d01-aea7-639c4334334f
Yuen, Ho
b1df4c57-0c2a-44ac-ab40-22b88e8effe8
Annan, Reginald
c83b8cdc-5ad7-40d3-9c99-917d95fcf9e6
Monroy-Valle, Michele
32c49d3d-9cc4-4bbb-b1de-8425a8875cf6
Pulman, Andrew J
ff04044d-ef72-4ccd-8eac-287c3550e1cd
Aduku, Nana Esi
285aa641-315d-46f3-b6c1-79234f4379bd
Kyei-boateng, Samuel
f6234c57-a23d-47c8-b8e7-9f0b13a220cc
Pickup, Trevor M
f7767181-5760-48b8-aaa0-1b3a2c5acb40

Choi, Sunhea, Yuen, Ho, Annan, Reginald, Monroy-Valle, Michele, Pulman, Andrew J, Aduku, Nana Esi, Kyei-boateng, Samuel and Pickup, Trevor M (2017) Improving the management of severe acute malnutrition among infants and children through capacity building: findings from an evaluation study with malnutrition eLearning. In IUNS: 21st International Congress of Nutrition. Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 15-20, 2017: Abstracts. vol. 71, Karger. p. 360 . (doi:10.1159/000480486).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Background and objectives: The University of Southampton and International Malnutrition Task Force developed Malnutrition eLearning to reduce child mortality by Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) through training health professionals globally. Since made available in 2010, over 14,000 from 100+ countries used the course. To investigate its effectiveness, a 2-year evaluation study was conducted from 2015, face-to-face in Ghana and Central America (CA), and online in other countries.Methods: Using a mixed method approach, the study explored if and how Malnutrition eLearning supported knowledge gain and behavioural change (application of knowledge in clinical practice), and resulting clinical outcomes in the management of SAM. Assessments, questionnaires and interviews/focus groups were conducted with individual in-service and pre-service participants pre- and post-training, and 12 months of medical records data collection, observations and hospital personnel interviews were carried out from participating healthcare institutions.Results: Total 1,261 health professionals (Ghana:915, CA:142, other countries:201), and 10 hospitals and 2 community health centres in Ghana and 2 hospitals in CA participated in the study. 3,955 (pre:01/08/2014–31/07/2015) and 3,737 (post:01/08/2015– 31/07/2016) medical records of children (0-60 months) were collected from the hospitals, and summary data on malnutrition cases (pre:76, post:67) from community health centres. Individual participants scored significantly higher in the post assessment (mean difference(SD): 14.0(12.5), 95%CI(12.7, 15.2), p<0.001). 87% of in-service health professionals (102/117) applied their knowledge and changed clinical practice in screening, assessment, diagnosis and management of SAM. This group demonstrated retained knowledge 6-month after the training (mean difference from pre-assessment(SD): 12.7(11.7), 95%CI(10.4, 15.0),p<0.001). Significant increases (p<0.001) in recording malnutrition-markers, i.e. length/height and weight-for-length/ height z-score, and diagnosed SAM cases (pre: 491(12.4%), post: 810(21.7%)) were observed. Mortality by SAM was declined from 26(5.9%) to 14(1.9%) (p<0.001). The community centres initiated the management of SAM (pre:0/32, post:7/21).Conclusions: The results suggest that Malnutrition eLearning is effective in training the WHO guideline on the management of SAM. After a 2-day self-directed training with Malnutrition eLearning, the participants not only gained knowledge but were also able to apply the knowledge in their clinical practice, leading to significant impacts on clinical outcomes.Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the UK Department for International Development Nutrition Embedding Evaluation Programme, managed by PATH.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 October 2017
Published date: 13 October 2017

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Local EPrints ID: 421807
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421807
ISSN: 0250-6807
PURE UUID: bd6991b7-21e8-4fd8-9c6b-7a910441c79f

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Date deposited: 28 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 08 Jan 2019 17:30

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