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Longitudinal change in peripheral quantitative computed tomography assessment in older adults: The Hertfordshire Cohort Study

Longitudinal change in peripheral quantitative computed tomography assessment in older adults: The Hertfordshire Cohort Study
Longitudinal change in peripheral quantitative computed tomography assessment in older adults: The Hertfordshire Cohort Study
There are few longitudinal data on change in bone structure and muscle mass, strength and function in later life. We report these, and consider bone–muscle interrelationships in older men and women. We studied 188 men and 166 women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, who underwent peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the radius and tibia in 2004–2005 and then again in 2011–2012. Grip strength and gait speed were also assessed at both timepoints. Percentage change per year was calculated for grip strength, gait speed, muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA), fat cross-sectional area (fCSA) and diaphyseal bone parameters [total area (Tt.Ar), cortical area (Ct.Ar), cortical density (cBMD) and trabecular density (tBMD)]. The mean (SD) age of men and women at baseline was 68.9 (2.5) and 69.2 (2.6) years, respectively. Rates of muscle area and strength loss did not differ by sex. Tt.Ar increased with age and faster in men [mean (SD) 1.78 (1.64) %/year] than women [mean (SD) 1.03 (1.69) %/year] in the radius (p < 0.001). In both the radius (p = 0.006) and tibia (p < 0.001), Ct.Ar reduced more rapidly in women than men. Change in Ct.Ar was associated with change in muscle area in the corresponding limb (radius; men: regression coefficient 0.36, 95% CI 0.20–0.52, p < 0.001; tibia; men: regression coefficient 0.14, 95% CI 0.00–0.27, p = 0.043, women: regression coefficient 0.16, 95% CI 0.01–0.30, p = 0.032). We have demonstrated that muscle strength and function decrease faster than muscle mass and have provided further evidence that changes in bone structure with age differ by sex.
0171-967X
Patel, A
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Edwards, M.H.
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Jameson, Karen
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Ward, Kathryn
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Fuggle, Nicholas
ade389ee-fd15-4b34-9716-3541c2b0e7a9
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Patel, A
bd59fe8a-e94a-4d76-9d1c-b44989eae663
Edwards, M.H.
8d92e1ef-8d4d-4efa-a183-305cd9ca1125
Jameson, Karen
d5fb142d-06af-456e-9016-17497f94e9f2
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Fuggle, Nicholas
ade389ee-fd15-4b34-9716-3541c2b0e7a9
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Patel, A, Edwards, M.H., Jameson, Karen, Ward, Kathryn, Fuggle, Nicholas, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2018) Longitudinal change in peripheral quantitative computed tomography assessment in older adults: The Hertfordshire Cohort Study. Calcified Tissue International. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There are few longitudinal data on change in bone structure and muscle mass, strength and function in later life. We report these, and consider bone–muscle interrelationships in older men and women. We studied 188 men and 166 women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, who underwent peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the radius and tibia in 2004–2005 and then again in 2011–2012. Grip strength and gait speed were also assessed at both timepoints. Percentage change per year was calculated for grip strength, gait speed, muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA), fat cross-sectional area (fCSA) and diaphyseal bone parameters [total area (Tt.Ar), cortical area (Ct.Ar), cortical density (cBMD) and trabecular density (tBMD)]. The mean (SD) age of men and women at baseline was 68.9 (2.5) and 69.2 (2.6) years, respectively. Rates of muscle area and strength loss did not differ by sex. Tt.Ar increased with age and faster in men [mean (SD) 1.78 (1.64) %/year] than women [mean (SD) 1.03 (1.69) %/year] in the radius (p < 0.001). In both the radius (p = 0.006) and tibia (p < 0.001), Ct.Ar reduced more rapidly in women than men. Change in Ct.Ar was associated with change in muscle area in the corresponding limb (radius; men: regression coefficient 0.36, 95% CI 0.20–0.52, p < 0.001; tibia; men: regression coefficient 0.14, 95% CI 0.00–0.27, p = 0.043, women: regression coefficient 0.16, 95% CI 0.01–0.30, p = 0.032). We have demonstrated that muscle strength and function decrease faster than muscle mass and have provided further evidence that changes in bone structure with age differ by sex.

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Accepted/In Press date: 11 June 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421849
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421849
ISSN: 0171-967X
PURE UUID: 18c22ff8-6137-4edf-a7a2-d2a0a4762470
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 02 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Jun 2019 04:01

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Contributors

Author: A Patel
Author: M.H. Edwards
Author: Karen Jameson
Author: Kathryn Ward ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Fuggle
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD

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