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Place and preference effects on the association between mental health and internal migration within Great Britain

Place and preference effects on the association between mental health and internal migration within Great Britain
Place and preference effects on the association between mental health and internal migration within Great Britain
Individuals with mental health needs are more likely to migrate than the general population, but the effects of migration preference and place of residence are often overlooked. These issues are addressed through the application of a novel origin and destination multilevel model to survey data. In comparison to those with good mental health, individuals with poor mental health are more likely to make undesired moves and this is moderated, but not explained by place of residence. Implications for understanding the mental health and migration relationship, and its impact on service provision are then proposed.
1353-8292
180-187
Wilding, Sam
a026cae1-cc72-49b5-a52b-ec1d931d72e1
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Wilding, Sam
a026cae1-cc72-49b5-a52b-ec1d931d72e1
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f

Wilding, Sam, Moon, Graham and Martin, David (2018) Place and preference effects on the association between mental health and internal migration within Great Britain. Health & Place, 52, 180-187. (doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.06.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Individuals with mental health needs are more likely to migrate than the general population, but the effects of migration preference and place of residence are often overlooked. These issues are addressed through the application of a novel origin and destination multilevel model to survey data. In comparison to those with good mental health, individuals with poor mental health are more likely to make undesired moves and this is moderated, but not explained by place of residence. Implications for understanding the mental health and migration relationship, and its impact on service provision are then proposed.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 June 2018
Published date: July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421881
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421881
ISSN: 1353-8292
PURE UUID: 1fd9f97d-5d16-4434-9ac2-358dbde5d3df
ORCID for Sam Wilding: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4184-2821
ORCID for Graham Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:53

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