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Describing reasons for loneliness among older people in Nigeria

Describing reasons for loneliness among older people in Nigeria
Describing reasons for loneliness among older people in Nigeria

The rural-urban migration of family members often leads to a higher probability of older people living alone, and minimizes family/social networks, which increases old age loneliness. In this study, we describe the existence of loneliness among older adults in Nigeria and its factors, aiming to inform the development of interventions for reducing old age loneliness. We adopted a descriptive phenomenological approach to the qualitative design, purposefully selecting and conducting face-to-face interviews with 12 older adults aged 58–88. We analyzed the data using a Thematic Analysis. Results of the analysis revealed three major themes: perception and existence of loneliness, factors for loneliness, and context-dependent coping strategies. We described results based on the theory of interactionist perspectives of loneliness and drew policy implications from this. Participants drew interesting associations between loneliness, decreasing family/social networks, recent family ties structures, disability-associated ageing, and lack of social programs, and suggested context-dependent coping strategies to reduce loneliness.

Ageing, loneliness, sub-Saharan Africa, thematic analysis
0163-4372
1-19
Ojembe, Blessing Ugochi
532e3ad3-b541-4b19-a895-71bb3542a85a
Ebe Kalu, Michael
4f427b4f-b86b-4ac4-807b-fd86be65fe8c
Ojembe, Blessing Ugochi
532e3ad3-b541-4b19-a895-71bb3542a85a
Ebe Kalu, Michael
4f427b4f-b86b-4ac4-807b-fd86be65fe8c

Ojembe, Blessing Ugochi and Ebe Kalu, Michael (2018) Describing reasons for loneliness among older people in Nigeria. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 1-19. (doi:10.1080/01634372.2018.1487495).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The rural-urban migration of family members often leads to a higher probability of older people living alone, and minimizes family/social networks, which increases old age loneliness. In this study, we describe the existence of loneliness among older adults in Nigeria and its factors, aiming to inform the development of interventions for reducing old age loneliness. We adopted a descriptive phenomenological approach to the qualitative design, purposefully selecting and conducting face-to-face interviews with 12 older adults aged 58–88. We analyzed the data using a Thematic Analysis. Results of the analysis revealed three major themes: perception and existence of loneliness, factors for loneliness, and context-dependent coping strategies. We described results based on the theory of interactionist perspectives of loneliness and drew policy implications from this. Participants drew interesting associations between loneliness, decreasing family/social networks, recent family ties structures, disability-associated ageing, and lack of social programs, and suggested context-dependent coping strategies to reduce loneliness.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2018
Keywords: Ageing, loneliness, sub-Saharan Africa, thematic analysis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421890
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421890
ISSN: 0163-4372
PURE UUID: c372ce60-404a-44b8-90c0-e9cea4ee2108

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:49

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