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The development of cross-cultural recognition of vocal emotion during childhood and adolescence

The development of cross-cultural recognition of vocal emotion during childhood and adolescence
The development of cross-cultural recognition of vocal emotion during childhood and adolescence

Humans have an innate set of emotions recognised universally. However, emotion recognition also depends on socio-cultural rules. Although adults recognise vocal emotions universally, they identify emotions more accurately in their native language. We examined developmental trajectories of universal vocal emotion recognition in children. Eighty native English speakers completed a vocal emotion recognition task in their native language (English) and foreign languages (Spanish, Chinese, and Arabic) expressing anger, happiness, sadness, fear, and neutrality. Emotion recognition was compared across 8-to-10, 11-to-13-year-olds, and adults. Measures of behavioural and emotional problems were also taken. Results showed that although emotion recognition was above chance for all languages, native English speaking children were more accurate in recognising vocal emotions in their native language. There was a larger improvement in recognising vocal emotion from the native language during adolescence. Vocal anger recognition did not improve with age for the non-native languages. This is the first study to demonstrate universality of vocal emotion recognition in children whilst supporting an "in-group advantage" for more accurate recognition in the native language. Findings highlight the role of experience in emotion recognition, have implications for child development in modern multicultural societies and address important theoretical questions about the nature of emotions.

2045-2322
1-17
Chronaki, Georgia
6c486b0a-c073-4cca-8abe-2837c067d89a
Wigelsworth, Michael
58052c23-4d1a-43d7-9610-1fb9aebade50
Pell, Marc D.
bd0ca37b-eba4-4858-8c6e-149096e6b920
Kotz, Sonja A.
9500a34e-3ad9-45c7-a478-0564f592cd46
Chronaki, Georgia
6c486b0a-c073-4cca-8abe-2837c067d89a
Wigelsworth, Michael
58052c23-4d1a-43d7-9610-1fb9aebade50
Pell, Marc D.
bd0ca37b-eba4-4858-8c6e-149096e6b920
Kotz, Sonja A.
9500a34e-3ad9-45c7-a478-0564f592cd46

Chronaki, Georgia, Wigelsworth, Michael, Pell, Marc D. and Kotz, Sonja A. (2018) The development of cross-cultural recognition of vocal emotion during childhood and adolescence. Scientific Reports, 8 (1), 1-17, [8659]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-018-26889-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Humans have an innate set of emotions recognised universally. However, emotion recognition also depends on socio-cultural rules. Although adults recognise vocal emotions universally, they identify emotions more accurately in their native language. We examined developmental trajectories of universal vocal emotion recognition in children. Eighty native English speakers completed a vocal emotion recognition task in their native language (English) and foreign languages (Spanish, Chinese, and Arabic) expressing anger, happiness, sadness, fear, and neutrality. Emotion recognition was compared across 8-to-10, 11-to-13-year-olds, and adults. Measures of behavioural and emotional problems were also taken. Results showed that although emotion recognition was above chance for all languages, native English speaking children were more accurate in recognising vocal emotions in their native language. There was a larger improvement in recognising vocal emotion from the native language during adolescence. Vocal anger recognition did not improve with age for the non-native languages. This is the first study to demonstrate universality of vocal emotion recognition in children whilst supporting an "in-group advantage" for more accurate recognition in the native language. Findings highlight the role of experience in emotion recognition, have implications for child development in modern multicultural societies and address important theoretical questions about the nature of emotions.

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s41598-018-26889-1 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 8 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 June 2018
Published date: 1 December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421893
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421893
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: eaac55a1-68a3-456b-ab65-3097e57a5ea8

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Date deposited: 06 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:12

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