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Job stress and post-retirement health in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study

Job stress and post-retirement health in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study
Job stress and post-retirement health in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study
Background: job demand-control (DC) and effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) are two commonly-used measures of work stress which are independently associated with health.

Aims: to test the hypothesis that DC and ERI have different and cumulative effects on health.

Methods: DC and ERI were assessed in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. The characteristics and occupations of men and women reporting either or both work stresses were compared and the interaction of these with health status were explored.

Results: complete data were available for 1,021 men and 753 women, reporting on their most recent or current job. 647 (63%) men and 444 (59%) women reported neither work stress whilst 103 (10%) men and 78 (10%) women reported both. Patterns of ERI and DC, alone and in combination, were different by type of occupation and by gender. Men reporting both work stresses (as compared with neither) were more likely to be single. Reported ERI with DC in the most recent or current job was associated with: poorer SF-36 physical function scores (OR 2.3 [95%CI 1.5-3.7] for men; OR 2.0 [95%CI 1.2-3.6] for women) and mental health scores (OR 2.8 [95%CI 1.8-4.4] for men; OR 3.1 [95%CI 1.8-5.3] for women). Moreover, average grip strength was 1.7kg (95%CI 0.2-3.3) lower among men who described both work stresses.

Conclusion: DC and ERI are two models of the psychosocial workplace environment which offer different but cumulative insight into the impacts of work on an individual’s psychological and physical health, particularly in a population sample.
0962-7480
572-579
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
D'angelo, Stefania
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Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Syddall, Holly Emma
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Syddall, Holly Emma
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328

Walker-Bone, Karen, D'angelo, Stefania, Stevens, Martin, Linaker, Catherine, Dennison, Elaine, Cooper, Cyrus and Syddall, Holly Emma (2018) Job stress and post-retirement health in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. Occupational Medicine, 68 (9), 572-579. (doi:10.1093/occmed/kqy123).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: job demand-control (DC) and effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) are two commonly-used measures of work stress which are independently associated with health.

Aims: to test the hypothesis that DC and ERI have different and cumulative effects on health.

Methods: DC and ERI were assessed in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. The characteristics and occupations of men and women reporting either or both work stresses were compared and the interaction of these with health status were explored.

Results: complete data were available for 1,021 men and 753 women, reporting on their most recent or current job. 647 (63%) men and 444 (59%) women reported neither work stress whilst 103 (10%) men and 78 (10%) women reported both. Patterns of ERI and DC, alone and in combination, were different by type of occupation and by gender. Men reporting both work stresses (as compared with neither) were more likely to be single. Reported ERI with DC in the most recent or current job was associated with: poorer SF-36 physical function scores (OR 2.3 [95%CI 1.5-3.7] for men; OR 2.0 [95%CI 1.2-3.6] for women) and mental health scores (OR 2.8 [95%CI 1.8-4.4] for men; OR 3.1 [95%CI 1.8-5.3] for women). Moreover, average grip strength was 1.7kg (95%CI 0.2-3.3) lower among men who described both work stresses.

Conclusion: DC and ERI are two models of the psychosocial workplace environment which offer different but cumulative insight into the impacts of work on an individual’s psychological and physical health, particularly in a population sample.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 September 2018
Published date: 26 December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421914
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421914
ISSN: 0962-7480
PURE UUID: 9de9fe46-6ffb-442c-90f0-ec7575af05e0
ORCID for Karen Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for Martin Stevens: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6142-5278
ORCID for Catherine Linaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1091-9283
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Holly Emma Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 28 Sep 2019 04:01

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