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Modelling three-dimensional cochlear micromechanics within the Guinea pig organ of Corti

Modelling three-dimensional cochlear micromechanics within the Guinea pig organ of Corti
Modelling three-dimensional cochlear micromechanics within the Guinea pig organ of Corti

The active amplification process in the mammalian cochlea depends on a complex interaction between cells within the organ of Corti. A three-dimensional (3D) model was developed using the finite element method based on anatomy for the apical end in the guinea pig cochlea, which is comprised of 3D discrete hair cells, 3D continuous membranes and fluid. The basilar membrane, tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are modelled with orthotropic materials. The Y-shape structures formed by the outer hair cell (OHC), the Deiters' cell and Deiters' cell phalangeal process are also included to account for the structural longitudinal coupling. The motion within the organ of Corti was first simulated in response to a pressure difference loading on the basilar membrane, in order to calculate the passive vibration pattern. Then, the outer hair cells somatic electromotility was implemented by applying a voltage across the OHC walls to investigate its contribution to membranes motion.

American Institute of Physics
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567

Ni, Guangjian and Elliott, Stephen J. (2018) Modelling three-dimensional cochlear micromechanics within the Guinea pig organ of Corti. In To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop. vol. 1965, American Institute of Physics.. (doi:10.1063/1.5038525).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The active amplification process in the mammalian cochlea depends on a complex interaction between cells within the organ of Corti. A three-dimensional (3D) model was developed using the finite element method based on anatomy for the apical end in the guinea pig cochlea, which is comprised of 3D discrete hair cells, 3D continuous membranes and fluid. The basilar membrane, tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are modelled with orthotropic materials. The Y-shape structures formed by the outer hair cell (OHC), the Deiters' cell and Deiters' cell phalangeal process are also included to account for the structural longitudinal coupling. The motion within the organ of Corti was first simulated in response to a pressure difference loading on the basilar membrane, in order to calculate the passive vibration pattern. Then, the outer hair cells somatic electromotility was implemented by applying a voltage across the OHC walls to investigate its contribution to membranes motion.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 January 2017
Published date: 31 May 2018
Venue - Dates: 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop: To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics, St. Catharines, Canada, 2017-06-19 - 2017-06-24

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421930
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421930
PURE UUID: 743bb597-043b-419d-9bf9-22764425f223
ORCID for Guangjian Ni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9240-3020

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:40

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