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Advanced cellular systems to study tuberculosis treatment

Advanced cellular systems to study tuberculosis treatment
Advanced cellular systems to study tuberculosis treatment
Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills more humans than any other infection and drug resistant strains are progressively emerging. Whilst the successful development of new agents for multi-drug resistant Mtb represents a major step forward, this progress must be balanced against recent disappointments in treatment-shortening trials. Consequently, there is a pressing need to strengthen the pipeline of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) and develop innovative therapeutic regimes. Approaches that bridge diverse disciplines are likely to be required to provide systems that address the limitations of current experimental models. Mtb is an obligate human pathogen that has undergone extensive co-evolution, resulting in a complex interplay between the host and pathogen. This chronic interaction involves multiple micro-environments, which may underlie some of the challenges in developing new drugs. The authors propose that advanced cell culture models of TB are likely to be an important addition to the experimental armamentarium in developing new approaches to TB, and here we review recent progress in this area and discuss the principal challenges.
1471-4892
16-21
Bielecka, Magdalena K.
90391ea3-aa1f-4104-a893-568c138718a2
Elkington, Paul
60828c7c-3d32-47c9-9fcc-6c4c54c35a15
Bielecka, Magdalena K.
90391ea3-aa1f-4104-a893-568c138718a2
Elkington, Paul
60828c7c-3d32-47c9-9fcc-6c4c54c35a15

Bielecka, Magdalena K. and Elkington, Paul (2018) Advanced cellular systems to study tuberculosis treatment. Current Opinion in Pharmacology, 42, 16-21. (doi:10.1016/j.coph.2018.06.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills more humans than any other infection and drug resistant strains are progressively emerging. Whilst the successful development of new agents for multi-drug resistant Mtb represents a major step forward, this progress must be balanced against recent disappointments in treatment-shortening trials. Consequently, there is a pressing need to strengthen the pipeline of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) and develop innovative therapeutic regimes. Approaches that bridge diverse disciplines are likely to be required to provide systems that address the limitations of current experimental models. Mtb is an obligate human pathogen that has undergone extensive co-evolution, resulting in a complex interplay between the host and pathogen. This chronic interaction involves multiple micro-environments, which may underlie some of the challenges in developing new drugs. The authors propose that advanced cell culture models of TB are likely to be an important addition to the experimental armamentarium in developing new approaches to TB, and here we review recent progress in this area and discuss the principal challenges.

Text
Pharmacol_review_RS_final_AA - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 July 2018
Published date: October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421999
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421999
ISSN: 1471-4892
PURE UUID: 4728259b-4805-4f23-8622-ef1db1113145
ORCID for Paul Elkington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0390-0613

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jul 2018 16:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:35

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