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The importance of green spaces to public health: a multi-continental analysis

The importance of green spaces to public health: a multi-continental analysis
The importance of green spaces to public health: a multi-continental analysis
As green spaces are a common feature of liveable cities, a detailed understanding of the benefits provided by these areas is essential. Although green spaces are regarded as a major contribution to the human well-being in urbanised areas, current research has largely focused on the cities in developed countries and their global importance in terms of public health benefits remains unclear. In this study, we performed a multiple linear regression using 34 cities in different regions across the globe to investigate the relationship between green spaces and public health. Our analysis suggested that for richer cities, green spaces were associated with better public health; whereas a greater area of green spaces was associated with reduced public health in the poorest cities. In contrast to previous studies, which typically found positive relationships between green spaces and health benefits, we demonstrate that health benefits of green spaces could be context dependent.
cities, ecosystem services, health benefits, human well-being, green infrastructure, mental health, wealth
1051-0761
1473-1480
Amano, Tatsuya
e7c187c3-c64d-4798-886e-14527301e162
Butt, Isabel
5dd342ca-6f16-41fd-ac35-10b059477b27
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Amano, Tatsuya
e7c187c3-c64d-4798-886e-14527301e162
Butt, Isabel
5dd342ca-6f16-41fd-ac35-10b059477b27
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc

Amano, Tatsuya, Butt, Isabel and Peh, Kelvin S.-H. (2018) The importance of green spaces to public health: a multi-continental analysis. Ecological Applications, 28 (6), 1473-1480. (doi:10.1002/eap.1748).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As green spaces are a common feature of liveable cities, a detailed understanding of the benefits provided by these areas is essential. Although green spaces are regarded as a major contribution to the human well-being in urbanised areas, current research has largely focused on the cities in developed countries and their global importance in terms of public health benefits remains unclear. In this study, we performed a multiple linear regression using 34 cities in different regions across the globe to investigate the relationship between green spaces and public health. Our analysis suggested that for richer cities, green spaces were associated with better public health; whereas a greater area of green spaces was associated with reduced public health in the poorest cities. In contrast to previous studies, which typically found positive relationships between green spaces and health benefits, we demonstrate that health benefits of green spaces could be context dependent.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 April 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 June 2018
Published date: September 2018
Keywords: cities, ecosystem services, health benefits, human well-being, green infrastructure, mental health, wealth

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422031
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422031
ISSN: 1051-0761
PURE UUID: 96ceed54-f9f1-47b3-88c3-850933225e8f
ORCID for Kelvin S.-H. Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

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Date deposited: 12 Jul 2018 16:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:35

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