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Men who have sex with men who do not access sexual health clinics nor disclose sexual orientation are unlikely to accept the HPV vaccine in the UK

Men who have sex with men who do not access sexual health clinics nor disclose sexual orientation are unlikely to accept the HPV vaccine in the UK
Men who have sex with men who do not access sexual health clinics nor disclose sexual orientation are unlikely to accept the HPV vaccine in the UK
Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are recommended the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination due to their higher risk of genital warts and anal cancer. Purpose: To examine HPV vaccine acceptability amongst MSM in the UK. Methods: Using advertisements via Facebook, MSM were recruited to an online survey measuring motivations for HPV vaccination. Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability. Results: Out of 1508 MSM (median age = 22, range: 14–63 years) only 19% had good knowledge of HPV. Overall, 55% of MSM were willing to ask for the HPV vaccine and 89% would accept it if offered by a healthcare professional (HCP). Access to sexual health clinics (SHCs) [OR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.29–2.89], the disclosure of sexual orientation to a HCP [OR = 2.02, CI 1.39–3.14] and HIV-positive status [OR = 1.96, CI 1.09–3.53] positively predicted HPV vaccine acceptability. After receiving information about HPV, perceptions of HPV risk [OR = 1.31, CI 1.05–1.63], HPV infection severity [OR = 1.89, CI 1.16–3.01), HPV vaccination benefits [OR = 1.61, CI 1.14–3.01], HPV vaccine effectiveness [OR = 1.54, CI 1.14–2.08], and the lack of perceived barriers to HPV vaccination [OR = 4.46, CI 2.95–6.73] were also associated with acceptability. Conclusions: Although nearly half of MSM would not actively pursue HPV vaccination, the vast majority would accept the vaccine if recommended by HCPs. In order to achieve optimal uptake, vaccine promotion campaigns should focus on MSM who do not access SHCs and those unwilling to disclose their sexual orientation.
0264-410X
1-6
Nadarzynski, Tomasz
218d69a1-d1be-46f4-bead-23071bd4f270
Smith, Helen
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Richardson, Daniel
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Bremner, Stephen
0e117fa6-27ea-41cc-9523-70f90cd65bc0
Llewellyn, Carrie
dec6fd41-d8d5-4f56-8b9f-c5825c2559f8
Nadarzynski, Tomasz
218d69a1-d1be-46f4-bead-23071bd4f270
Smith, Helen
0fc76895-af10-482a-8e5c-034dfcde4f9e
Richardson, Daniel
f6ccb6a1-c3af-4479-b5b5-ade1c64b501f
Bremner, Stephen
0e117fa6-27ea-41cc-9523-70f90cd65bc0
Llewellyn, Carrie
dec6fd41-d8d5-4f56-8b9f-c5825c2559f8

Nadarzynski, Tomasz, Smith, Helen, Richardson, Daniel, Bremner, Stephen and Llewellyn, Carrie (2018) Men who have sex with men who do not access sexual health clinics nor disclose sexual orientation are unlikely to accept the HPV vaccine in the UK. Vaccine, 1-6.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are recommended the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination due to their higher risk of genital warts and anal cancer. Purpose: To examine HPV vaccine acceptability amongst MSM in the UK. Methods: Using advertisements via Facebook, MSM were recruited to an online survey measuring motivations for HPV vaccination. Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability. Results: Out of 1508 MSM (median age = 22, range: 14–63 years) only 19% had good knowledge of HPV. Overall, 55% of MSM were willing to ask for the HPV vaccine and 89% would accept it if offered by a healthcare professional (HCP). Access to sexual health clinics (SHCs) [OR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.29–2.89], the disclosure of sexual orientation to a HCP [OR = 2.02, CI 1.39–3.14] and HIV-positive status [OR = 1.96, CI 1.09–3.53] positively predicted HPV vaccine acceptability. After receiving information about HPV, perceptions of HPV risk [OR = 1.31, CI 1.05–1.63], HPV infection severity [OR = 1.89, CI 1.16–3.01), HPV vaccination benefits [OR = 1.61, CI 1.14–3.01], HPV vaccine effectiveness [OR = 1.54, CI 1.14–2.08], and the lack of perceived barriers to HPV vaccination [OR = 4.46, CI 2.95–6.73] were also associated with acceptability. Conclusions: Although nearly half of MSM would not actively pursue HPV vaccination, the vast majority would accept the vaccine if recommended by HCPs. In order to achieve optimal uptake, vaccine promotion campaigns should focus on MSM who do not access SHCs and those unwilling to disclose their sexual orientation.

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HPV vaccination for MSM - SRO - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 29 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422188
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422188
ISSN: 0264-410X
PURE UUID: 8450fed4-2db3-4097-978f-a22080dcf70a

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Date deposited: 18 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:04

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Contributors

Author: Tomasz Nadarzynski
Author: Helen Smith
Author: Daniel Richardson
Author: Stephen Bremner
Author: Carrie Llewellyn

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