The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The assembly of an integrated theoretical framework to assess the legitimacy of prison privatisation policies in England and Wales: an interdisciplinary multidimensional meta-model to evaluate the implications of contracting out imprisonment in Mexico

The assembly of an integrated theoretical framework to assess the legitimacy of prison privatisation policies in England and Wales: an interdisciplinary multidimensional meta-model to evaluate the implications of contracting out imprisonment in Mexico
The assembly of an integrated theoretical framework to assess the legitimacy of prison privatisation policies in England and Wales: an interdisciplinary multidimensional meta-model to evaluate the implications of contracting out imprisonment in Mexico
Prison privatisation was recommended to enhance efficiency, economy and innovation as mean to tackle penal crises. Private sector involvement in the prison system was authorized in Mexico without consultation process which would have informed legislators about the wider implications of this penal policy that affect its legitimation.

This research examines key questions: the multidisciplinarity of legitimacy; the extent to which legitimacy of private prisons has been examined; the need for a multidimensional evaluative method of legitimacy; and the legitimating factors to be acknowledged and essential in the prison privatisation debate.

Considering that policymakers, politicians and practitioners ought to be aware of the implications of prison privatisation and that the legitimisation of this penal policy is utmost, the goal of this thesis is to develop a new methodology to assess the legitimacy of private prisons, based on principles extrapolated from various disciplines and related to particular issues.

Private operation of prisons in England and Wales has provided literature that, in addition to a much wider scholarly canon, will be examined to draw lessons for the Mexican case, and to establish principles underpinning particular categories of legitimacy, related to three disciplines: Philosophy, Sociology and Management. Each of these areas is linked to the participants in this phenomenon: governments, society and corporations. The purpose of this research is to add to the debate, which should enter a new stage, since recent developments in the operation of private prisons question their legitimacy. Through the construction of a new evaluative methodology in the form of a meta-model, it contributes to theory and policy about legitimacy and prison privatisation, by providing a guideline to acknowledge the implications and factors of its legitimation, in order to evaluate, re-evaluate or reform this penal policy.
University of Southampton
Olivas Maldonado, Hector
49f5fecd-9d67-4189-af12-b987f1a1d97a
Olivas Maldonado, Hector
49f5fecd-9d67-4189-af12-b987f1a1d97a
Telford, Mark
6827a668-f52c-4b04-ba4b-1ee794d66441

Olivas Maldonado, Hector (2017) The assembly of an integrated theoretical framework to assess the legitimacy of prison privatisation policies in England and Wales: an interdisciplinary multidimensional meta-model to evaluate the implications of contracting out imprisonment in Mexico. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 275pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Prison privatisation was recommended to enhance efficiency, economy and innovation as mean to tackle penal crises. Private sector involvement in the prison system was authorized in Mexico without consultation process which would have informed legislators about the wider implications of this penal policy that affect its legitimation.

This research examines key questions: the multidisciplinarity of legitimacy; the extent to which legitimacy of private prisons has been examined; the need for a multidimensional evaluative method of legitimacy; and the legitimating factors to be acknowledged and essential in the prison privatisation debate.

Considering that policymakers, politicians and practitioners ought to be aware of the implications of prison privatisation and that the legitimisation of this penal policy is utmost, the goal of this thesis is to develop a new methodology to assess the legitimacy of private prisons, based on principles extrapolated from various disciplines and related to particular issues.

Private operation of prisons in England and Wales has provided literature that, in addition to a much wider scholarly canon, will be examined to draw lessons for the Mexican case, and to establish principles underpinning particular categories of legitimacy, related to three disciplines: Philosophy, Sociology and Management. Each of these areas is linked to the participants in this phenomenon: governments, society and corporations. The purpose of this research is to add to the debate, which should enter a new stage, since recent developments in the operation of private prisons question their legitimacy. Through the construction of a new evaluative methodology in the form of a meta-model, it contributes to theory and policy about legitimacy and prison privatisation, by providing a guideline to acknowledge the implications and factors of its legitimation, in order to evaluate, re-evaluate or reform this penal policy.

Text
Final submission of thesis - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (2MB)

More information

Published date: September 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422202
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422202
PURE UUID: 44030ca5-867e-41f3-910e-0ac0a84e145a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jul 2018 16:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:05

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×