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Conditionally and highly automated vehicle handover: a study exploring vocal communication between two drivers

Conditionally and highly automated vehicle handover: a study exploring vocal communication between two drivers
Conditionally and highly automated vehicle handover: a study exploring vocal communication between two drivers

Automated Vehicles with levels 3 and 4 capability involve the handover of control and responsibility between driver and automation. The handover task represents a vulnerability in a given system due to the reduction of situation awareness and possible breakdowns in communication. Handover assistants are a design approach proposed to counteract these vulnerabilities. This study investigated the concept of a vocal handover assistant by exploring information transferred, and the methods for doing so, in naturalistic vocal handover between two drivers. Additionally, it was hypothesised that scripted vocal methods would differ in measures of workload, usability, acceptance and the effect on longitudinal/lateral driving behaviour. In each trial, two drivers took part in a driving simulation exchanging control from one-another. Drivers took part in six conditions: four pre-set conditions related to a different interaction style and two ‘free-form’ conditions before and after pre-set conditions. Our results show a change in information-types transferred and methods adopted for communication from before to after taking part in pre-set conditions. Other findings highlight considerations to be made such as training, personalization, the transmission of priority as well as contextual information, and how handover methods may affect the control of the vehicle following handover. Grice's Maxims were applied to handover methods to facilitate discussion. We present four considerations for future design: efficiency, personalization, and presentation of prioritised and context-related information.

Automobile, Handover, High automation, Takeover, Vocal communication
1369-8478
1-17
Clark, Jediah R.
07dcfd4e-13c9-4512-9a00-f175c24512a9
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0
Clark, Jediah R.
07dcfd4e-13c9-4512-9a00-f175c24512a9
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0

Clark, Jediah R., Stanton, Neville A. and Revell, Kirsten M.A. (2018) Conditionally and highly automated vehicle handover: a study exploring vocal communication between two drivers. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 1-17. (doi:10.1016/j.trf.2018.06.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Automated Vehicles with levels 3 and 4 capability involve the handover of control and responsibility between driver and automation. The handover task represents a vulnerability in a given system due to the reduction of situation awareness and possible breakdowns in communication. Handover assistants are a design approach proposed to counteract these vulnerabilities. This study investigated the concept of a vocal handover assistant by exploring information transferred, and the methods for doing so, in naturalistic vocal handover between two drivers. Additionally, it was hypothesised that scripted vocal methods would differ in measures of workload, usability, acceptance and the effect on longitudinal/lateral driving behaviour. In each trial, two drivers took part in a driving simulation exchanging control from one-another. Drivers took part in six conditions: four pre-set conditions related to a different interaction style and two ‘free-form’ conditions before and after pre-set conditions. Our results show a change in information-types transferred and methods adopted for communication from before to after taking part in pre-set conditions. Other findings highlight considerations to be made such as training, personalization, the transmission of priority as well as contextual information, and how handover methods may affect the control of the vehicle following handover. Grice's Maxims were applied to handover methods to facilitate discussion. We present four considerations for future design: efficiency, personalization, and presentation of prioritised and context-related information.

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Handover Communication in Automated Vehicles - 2nd Revision - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2018
Keywords: Automobile, Handover, High automation, Takeover, Vocal communication

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422402
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422402
ISSN: 1369-8478
PURE UUID: 3f7f4392-f119-4d4f-996d-e2ae31ecb64d
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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