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Simulations of decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system

Simulations of decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system
Simulations of decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system
The results of simulations to demonstrate decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system are presented in this work. Conventional vibration control designs rest on centrality, and the central processor deals with information of the entire system. When large-scale systems are considered, decentralized vibration control system provides an alternative design. The simulated system in this work is a simply supported beam that is collocated with 50 localized processor nodes which can communicate with each other. Each node will calculate and supply the control force to control the beam vibration according to the shared sensor information among the nodes and an optimal direct velocity feedback algorithm. The simulation results demonstrate that decentralized vibration control can achieve a global control objective, making it suitable for large-scale systems. The effects of network communication delay and feedback architecture on control performance are demonstrated.
0819448540
302-313
International Society for Optical Engineering
Tao, Tao
37eae295-3133-4f55-a148-4ef451773366
Frampton, Kenneth D.
94506b25-ed47-4216-8795-9f33a3761cfc
Smith, Ralph C.
Tao, Tao
37eae295-3133-4f55-a148-4ef451773366
Frampton, Kenneth D.
94506b25-ed47-4216-8795-9f33a3761cfc
Smith, Ralph C.

Tao, Tao and Frampton, Kenneth D. (2003) Simulations of decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system. Smith, Ralph C. (ed.) In Smart Structures and Materials 2003: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control. vol. 5049, International Society for Optical Engineering. pp. 302-313 . (doi:10.1117/12.484015).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The results of simulations to demonstrate decentralized vibration control with a networked embedded system are presented in this work. Conventional vibration control designs rest on centrality, and the central processor deals with information of the entire system. When large-scale systems are considered, decentralized vibration control system provides an alternative design. The simulated system in this work is a simply supported beam that is collocated with 50 localized processor nodes which can communicate with each other. Each node will calculate and supply the control force to control the beam vibration according to the shared sensor information among the nodes and an optimal direct velocity feedback algorithm. The simulation results demonstrate that decentralized vibration control can achieve a global control objective, making it suitable for large-scale systems. The effects of network communication delay and feedback architecture on control performance are demonstrated.

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Published date: 2003
Venue - Dates: Smart Structures and Materials 2003: Modeling, Signal Processing, and Control, 2003-03-03 - 2003-03-03

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 42249
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/42249
ISBN: 0819448540
PURE UUID: 3c275274-46b7-4949-88ed-ac53fb69a955

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Date deposited: 29 Nov 2006
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:12

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Contributors

Author: Tao Tao
Author: Kenneth D. Frampton
Editor: Ralph C. Smith

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