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Travel, transport and energy implications of university-related student travel: a case study approach

Travel, transport and energy implications of university-related student travel: a case study approach
Travel, transport and energy implications of university-related student travel: a case study approach
This study highlighted significant cultural differences and complexity in travel behaviour associated with travel to university across the UK and Ireland. This paper examines university travel behaviours and the implications for emissions, across the 2012–2013 academic year, based on responses from 1049 students across 17 universities in Ireland and the UK. Surveys were analysed to examine the trips of students both during term time and when accessing the universities each year. The data analysis in this paper examines three aspects of the transport implications of travel to and from university. Firstly the journey between university and term time address (or permanent address if the respondent does not have a separate term time address), secondly the journey between the university area and a separate permanent address where relevant; and thirdly implications for emissions resulting from university-related travel.

The study found that student car users were more likely to be female, older students, or studying part time; male students were more likely to use active modes. The study indicated interesting differences between students living in different parts of the UK and Ireland. For example, it was found that there was a higher level of car dependence amongst Northern Irish students compared to other areas; and a greater variability in travel distances in Scotland and Northern Ireland. In England, car use was more pronounced when students travelled from their permanent address to term time address, and, as in Ireland, there was evidence of more car sharing on such trips. Public transport usage was more pronounced amongst Scottish students. The effect of these transport choices on emissions is significant and demonstrates the importance of education related trips to the development of a transport policy response. The analysis shows that annual emissions are highest for regular travel to and from university when a student has a permanent address rather than a separate term time and permanent address.
1361-9209
27-40
Davison, Lisa
ca0a56c2-b949-448e-bf8a-f85afabf9f28
Ahern, Aoife
eaae342c-7693-4bae-a92d-1e02fc43e641
Hine, Julian
9ff568a0-4281-45d3-aebd-825b7901d227
Davison, Lisa
ca0a56c2-b949-448e-bf8a-f85afabf9f28
Ahern, Aoife
eaae342c-7693-4bae-a92d-1e02fc43e641
Hine, Julian
9ff568a0-4281-45d3-aebd-825b7901d227

Davison, Lisa, Ahern, Aoife and Hine, Julian (2015) Travel, transport and energy implications of university-related student travel: a case study approach. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 38, 27-40. (doi:10.1016/j.trd.2015.04.028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study highlighted significant cultural differences and complexity in travel behaviour associated with travel to university across the UK and Ireland. This paper examines university travel behaviours and the implications for emissions, across the 2012–2013 academic year, based on responses from 1049 students across 17 universities in Ireland and the UK. Surveys were analysed to examine the trips of students both during term time and when accessing the universities each year. The data analysis in this paper examines three aspects of the transport implications of travel to and from university. Firstly the journey between university and term time address (or permanent address if the respondent does not have a separate term time address), secondly the journey between the university area and a separate permanent address where relevant; and thirdly implications for emissions resulting from university-related travel.

The study found that student car users were more likely to be female, older students, or studying part time; male students were more likely to use active modes. The study indicated interesting differences between students living in different parts of the UK and Ireland. For example, it was found that there was a higher level of car dependence amongst Northern Irish students compared to other areas; and a greater variability in travel distances in Scotland and Northern Ireland. In England, car use was more pronounced when students travelled from their permanent address to term time address, and, as in Ireland, there was evidence of more car sharing on such trips. Public transport usage was more pronounced amongst Scottish students. The effect of these transport choices on emissions is significant and demonstrates the importance of education related trips to the development of a transport policy response. The analysis shows that annual emissions are highest for regular travel to and from university when a student has a permanent address rather than a separate term time and permanent address.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 22 May 2015
Published date: 1 July 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422510
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422510
ISSN: 1361-9209
PURE UUID: 55b5c95f-58ce-487f-a075-cb29e81db394

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Date deposited: 24 Jul 2018 16:31
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 10:31

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Contributors

Author: Lisa Davison
Author: Aoife Ahern
Author: Julian Hine

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