The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in severe asthma: Experience from the Wessex severe asthma cohort

Role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in severe asthma: Experience from the Wessex severe asthma cohort
Role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in severe asthma: Experience from the Wessex severe asthma cohort
Introduction: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common co-morbidity in severe asthmatics. Its role in the description of the disease process and its mechanisms remains to be confirmed.
Methods: We analysed the MRC Wessex severe asthma cohort data focussing on severe asthmatics. 324 patients were classified on the basis of treatment with anti-acid treatment (Proton pump inhibitors, H2 receptor blockers) as those with and without GORD. Data were analysed with appropriate statistical tests using SPSS and Graphpad Prism
Results: Gender distribution showed a prevalence of females compared to males (GORD-76.6% vs 23.4%; p<0.001) and high BMI in patients with GORD (p<0.001). GORD was associated with higher BTS management step (p<0.001), higher ACQ6 (p<0.001) and ACQ7 (p=0.001) scores, high HAD score (p=0.01) and lower AQLQ scores (p<0.001) but no significant difference in lung function. GORD patients were ca. twice as likely to be on prophylactic antibiotics (14.6% vs 7.2% p=0.04), suggesting poorer control and higher exacerbation rates. Patients with GORD also had higher median [range] number of hospital admissions in last 12 months (0 [0–2] vs.0 [0–0.2], p=0.01), unscheduled GP visits (p=0.03) and lifetime history of ICU admissions (p=0.03).
Conclusions: This study data highlights the importance of GORD as potentially describing a phenotype of asthma. Better definition of this phenotype has the potential to identify disease pathways associated with GORD that could help define new strategies for the management of severe asthma.
0903-1936
Tariq, Kamran
4de9ca91-e58a-49d7-970b-1b1cada17cf7
Barber, Clair
ff31b460-34c3-466c-90e4-f70b3e954c82
Gove, Kerry
6493b359-21cd-4068-88f4-a6e684f73316
Rupani, Hitasha
cbc7068a-4279-4c8e-b83f-353210711062
Brown, Tom
fdd42359-a39d-4f22-b48d-015d9b94ec76
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Chauhan, Anoop
4f606144-8948-4f82-8cb1-e57e7a05a8ed
Djukanovic, Ratko
d9a45ee7-6a80-4d84-a0ed-10962660a98d
Howarth, Peter
ff19c8c4-86b0-4a88-8f76-b3d87f142a21
Tariq, Kamran
4de9ca91-e58a-49d7-970b-1b1cada17cf7
Barber, Clair
ff31b460-34c3-466c-90e4-f70b3e954c82
Gove, Kerry
6493b359-21cd-4068-88f4-a6e684f73316
Rupani, Hitasha
cbc7068a-4279-4c8e-b83f-353210711062
Brown, Tom
fdd42359-a39d-4f22-b48d-015d9b94ec76
Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh
9c7b8105-2892-49f2-8775-54d4961e3e74
Chauhan, Anoop
4f606144-8948-4f82-8cb1-e57e7a05a8ed
Djukanovic, Ratko
d9a45ee7-6a80-4d84-a0ed-10962660a98d
Howarth, Peter
ff19c8c4-86b0-4a88-8f76-b3d87f142a21

Tariq, Kamran, Barber, Clair, Gove, Kerry, Rupani, Hitasha, Brown, Tom, Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh, Chauhan, Anoop, Djukanovic, Ratko and Howarth, Peter (2015) Role of gastro-oesophageal reflux in severe asthma: Experience from the Wessex severe asthma cohort. European Respiratory Journal, 46 (Suppl 59).

Record type: Meeting abstract

Abstract

Introduction: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a common co-morbidity in severe asthmatics. Its role in the description of the disease process and its mechanisms remains to be confirmed.
Methods: We analysed the MRC Wessex severe asthma cohort data focussing on severe asthmatics. 324 patients were classified on the basis of treatment with anti-acid treatment (Proton pump inhibitors, H2 receptor blockers) as those with and without GORD. Data were analysed with appropriate statistical tests using SPSS and Graphpad Prism
Results: Gender distribution showed a prevalence of females compared to males (GORD-76.6% vs 23.4%; p<0.001) and high BMI in patients with GORD (p<0.001). GORD was associated with higher BTS management step (p<0.001), higher ACQ6 (p<0.001) and ACQ7 (p=0.001) scores, high HAD score (p=0.01) and lower AQLQ scores (p<0.001) but no significant difference in lung function. GORD patients were ca. twice as likely to be on prophylactic antibiotics (14.6% vs 7.2% p=0.04), suggesting poorer control and higher exacerbation rates. Patients with GORD also had higher median [range] number of hospital admissions in last 12 months (0 [0–2] vs.0 [0–0.2], p=0.01), unscheduled GP visits (p=0.03) and lifetime history of ICU admissions (p=0.03).
Conclusions: This study data highlights the importance of GORD as potentially describing a phenotype of asthma. Better definition of this phenotype has the potential to identify disease pathways associated with GORD that could help define new strategies for the management of severe asthma.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2015
Venue - Dates: European Respiratory Society International Congress, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2015-11-26 - 2015-11-30

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422519
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422519
ISSN: 0903-1936
PURE UUID: 357ca638-9966-41c1-8bfa-9ed5fe925947
ORCID for Clair Barber: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5335-5129
ORCID for Ratko Djukanovic: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6039-5612

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:55

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×