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Handover assist in highly automated vehicles: how vocal communication guides visual attention

Handover assist in highly automated vehicles: how vocal communication guides visual attention
Handover assist in highly automated vehicles: how vocal communication guides visual attention

Automated vehicles that require human intervention will inevitably require the transition of control and responsibility between driver and automation. These ‘handovers’ represent a vulnerability in the driving system due to factors such as reduced situation awareness. As a solution, handover assistants have been proposed to alleviate these drawbacks and facilitate better communication between vehicle and driver. We present findings from a vocal-handover task between two drivers, conducted in a driving simulator, to explore how visually scanning the environment can be encouraged using different vocal interactions. The data revealed trends such as how mentioning location may encourage more efficient visual gaze. Conversely, no vocal interaction may result in little-to-no visual gaze towards certain areas of the driving environment. Further study could explore how vocal interaction can work in conjunction with visual displays to guide visual attention during the handover task.

Automation, Eye-Tracking, Handover, Human communication
2194-5357
295-306
Springer Verlag
Clark, Jediah
07dcfd4e-13c9-4512-9a00-f175c24512a9
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0
Clark, Jediah
07dcfd4e-13c9-4512-9a00-f175c24512a9
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0

Clark, Jediah, Stanton, Neville and Revell, Kirsten (2019) Handover assist in highly automated vehicles: how vocal communication guides visual attention. In Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. vol. 786, Springer Verlag. pp. 295-306 . (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_27).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Automated vehicles that require human intervention will inevitably require the transition of control and responsibility between driver and automation. These ‘handovers’ represent a vulnerability in the driving system due to factors such as reduced situation awareness. As a solution, handover assistants have been proposed to alleviate these drawbacks and facilitate better communication between vehicle and driver. We present findings from a vocal-handover task between two drivers, conducted in a driving simulator, to explore how visually scanning the environment can be encouraged using different vocal interactions. The data revealed trends such as how mentioning location may encourage more efficient visual gaze. Conversely, no vocal interaction may result in little-to-no visual gaze towards certain areas of the driving environment. Further study could explore how vocal interaction can work in conjunction with visual displays to guide visual attention during the handover task.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 28 June 2018
Published date: 2019
Venue - Dates: AHFE International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018, [state] FL, United States, 2018-07-21 - 2018-07-25
Keywords: Automation, Eye-Tracking, Handover, Human communication

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422528
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422528
ISSN: 2194-5357
PURE UUID: 9efa896c-c6e0-4020-b72a-c2085ef90d75

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 08 Apr 2019 16:31

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