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Origin and diversification of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.), a multipurpose underutilized legume

Origin and diversification of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.), a multipurpose underutilized legume
Origin and diversification of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.), a multipurpose underutilized legume
Premise of the Study

For many crops, research into the origin and partitioning of genetic variation is limited and this can slow or prevent crop improvement programs. Many of these underutilized crops have traits that could be of benefit in a changing climate due to stress tolerance or nutritional properties. Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.) is one such crop. All parts of the plant can be eaten, from the roots to the seeds, and is high in protein as well as other micronutrients. The goal of our study was to identify the wild progenitor and analyze the partitioning of genetic variation in the crop.

Methods

We used molecular phylogenetic analyses (cpDNA and nuclear ITS sequencing) to resolve relationships between all species in the genus, and population genetics (utilizing microsatellites) to identify genetic clusters of winged bean accessions and compare this to geography.

Key Results

We find that winged bean is genetically distinct from all other members of the genus. We also provide support for four groups of species in the genus, largely, but not completely, corresponding to the results of previous morphological analyses. Within winged bean, population genetic analysis using 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers suggests four genetic groups; however, there is little correspondence between the genetic variation and the geography of the accessions.

Conclusions

The true wild progenitor of winged bean remains unknown (or is extinct). There has likely been large‐scale cross‐breeding, trade, and transport of winged bean and/or multiple origins of the crop.

domestication, legume, Psophocarpus, underutilized crop, winged bean
0002-9122
888-897
Yang, Shuyi
0f9a6a65-92d8-48c0-891a-6c88668cdd06
Grall, Aurélie
7b82af39-21bd-4475-a168-3a9aa840b2ce
Chapman, Mark A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Yang, Shuyi
0f9a6a65-92d8-48c0-891a-6c88668cdd06
Grall, Aurélie
7b82af39-21bd-4475-a168-3a9aa840b2ce
Chapman, Mark A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383

Yang, Shuyi, Grall, Aurélie and Chapman, Mark A. (2018) Origin and diversification of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.), a multipurpose underutilized legume. American Journal of Botany, 105 (5), 888-897. (doi:10.1002/ajb2.1093).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Premise of the Study

For many crops, research into the origin and partitioning of genetic variation is limited and this can slow or prevent crop improvement programs. Many of these underutilized crops have traits that could be of benefit in a changing climate due to stress tolerance or nutritional properties. Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.) is one such crop. All parts of the plant can be eaten, from the roots to the seeds, and is high in protein as well as other micronutrients. The goal of our study was to identify the wild progenitor and analyze the partitioning of genetic variation in the crop.

Methods

We used molecular phylogenetic analyses (cpDNA and nuclear ITS sequencing) to resolve relationships between all species in the genus, and population genetics (utilizing microsatellites) to identify genetic clusters of winged bean accessions and compare this to geography.

Key Results

We find that winged bean is genetically distinct from all other members of the genus. We also provide support for four groups of species in the genus, largely, but not completely, corresponding to the results of previous morphological analyses. Within winged bean, population genetic analysis using 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers suggests four genetic groups; however, there is little correspondence between the genetic variation and the geography of the accessions.

Conclusions

The true wild progenitor of winged bean remains unknown (or is extinct). There has likely been large‐scale cross‐breeding, trade, and transport of winged bean and/or multiple origins of the crop.

Text
YangGrallChapman_Final - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 February 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 June 2018
Keywords: domestication, legume, Psophocarpus, underutilized crop, winged bean

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422564
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422564
ISSN: 0002-9122
PURE UUID: 2f509732-eedb-401f-b565-c684e87262d0
ORCID for Mark A. Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:37

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