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Ellipsis: of poetry and the experience of language after Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot

Ellipsis: of poetry and the experience of language after Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot
Ellipsis: of poetry and the experience of language after Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot
What is the nature of poetic language when its experience involves an encounter with finitude; with failure, loss, and absence? For Martin Heidegger this experience is central to any thinking that would seek to articulate the meaning of being, but for Friedrich Hölderlin and Maurice Blanchot it is a mark of the tragic and unanswerable demands of poetic language. In Ellipsis, a rigorous, original study on the language of poetry, the language of philosophy, and the limits of the word, William S. Allen offers the first in-depth examination of the development of Heidegger’s thinking of poetic language—which remains his most radical and yet most misunderstood work—that carefully balances it with the impossible demands of this experience of finitude, an experience of which Hölderlin and Blanchot have provided the most searching examinations. In bringing language up against its limits, Allen shows that poetic language not only exposes thinking to its abyssal grounds, but also indicates how the limits of our existence come themselves, traumatically, impossibly, to speak.
State University of New York (SUNY) Press
Allen, William
ef9ab226-9ae1-43be-a747-4fe394537116
Allen, William
ef9ab226-9ae1-43be-a747-4fe394537116

Allen, William (2007) Ellipsis: of poetry and the experience of language after Heidegger, Holderlin, and Blanchot (SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy), State University of New York (SUNY) Press, 254pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

What is the nature of poetic language when its experience involves an encounter with finitude; with failure, loss, and absence? For Martin Heidegger this experience is central to any thinking that would seek to articulate the meaning of being, but for Friedrich Hölderlin and Maurice Blanchot it is a mark of the tragic and unanswerable demands of poetic language. In Ellipsis, a rigorous, original study on the language of poetry, the language of philosophy, and the limits of the word, William S. Allen offers the first in-depth examination of the development of Heidegger’s thinking of poetic language—which remains his most radical and yet most misunderstood work—that carefully balances it with the impossible demands of this experience of finitude, an experience of which Hölderlin and Blanchot have provided the most searching examinations. In bringing language up against its limits, Allen shows that poetic language not only exposes thinking to its abyssal grounds, but also indicates how the limits of our existence come themselves, traumatically, impossibly, to speak.

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Published date: July 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422633
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422633
PURE UUID: d692e732-a9c0-4934-8503-380e5ab0fe2a
ORCID for William Allen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4731-2955

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Date deposited: 27 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:36

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