The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The Asosa region of western Ethiopia: a golden exploration opportunity

The Asosa region of western Ethiopia: a golden exploration opportunity
The Asosa region of western Ethiopia: a golden exploration opportunity
Gold mining has a legendary history in Ethiopia, with Ethiopian mines providing gold to the ancient Egyptian empire and possibly even King Solomon's Mines and the Queen of Sheba. Today, gold occurs in the Pan‐African age schist belt and Tertiary basaltic lavas of the Asosa region of Benishangul‐Gumuz, western Ethiopia. There is widespread artisanal gold production in the Asosa region, with moderate activity by small numbers of local workers producing relatively large amounts of gold. There is a strong relationship between predominantly shear zone‐hosted gold deposits and the Kuluck shear zone, suggesting a structural control on gold accumulation. Gold is also commonly associated with secondary sulphide mineralization and magnetite alteration in Asosa rocks. The source of the gold is thought to be the sub‐volcanic intrusions generated during the subduction of the oceanic crust at the trench island‐arc system, akin to what we see today in epithermal and porphyry type gold systems. Historical workings and anomalous gold concentrations in rock, soil and stream sediments point to a potentially significant untapped gold resource in the Asosa region of western Ethiopia.
0266-6979
31-34
Bullock, Liam A.
c6ffb9b0-0a54-4ab2-9edb-f97280e6ce2d
Morgan, Owen
1433deb2-4185-471f-ba1d-765ef468be93
Bullock, Liam A.
c6ffb9b0-0a54-4ab2-9edb-f97280e6ce2d
Morgan, Owen
1433deb2-4185-471f-ba1d-765ef468be93

Bullock, Liam A. and Morgan, Owen (2018) The Asosa region of western Ethiopia: a golden exploration opportunity. Geology Today, 34 (1), 31-34. (doi:10.1111/gto.2018.34.issue-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Gold mining has a legendary history in Ethiopia, with Ethiopian mines providing gold to the ancient Egyptian empire and possibly even King Solomon's Mines and the Queen of Sheba. Today, gold occurs in the Pan‐African age schist belt and Tertiary basaltic lavas of the Asosa region of Benishangul‐Gumuz, western Ethiopia. There is widespread artisanal gold production in the Asosa region, with moderate activity by small numbers of local workers producing relatively large amounts of gold. There is a strong relationship between predominantly shear zone‐hosted gold deposits and the Kuluck shear zone, suggesting a structural control on gold accumulation. Gold is also commonly associated with secondary sulphide mineralization and magnetite alteration in Asosa rocks. The source of the gold is thought to be the sub‐volcanic intrusions generated during the subduction of the oceanic crust at the trench island‐arc system, akin to what we see today in epithermal and porphyry type gold systems. Historical workings and anomalous gold concentrations in rock, soil and stream sediments point to a potentially significant untapped gold resource in the Asosa region of western Ethiopia.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 19 January 2018
Published date: January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422660
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422660
ISSN: 0266-6979
PURE UUID: c9644cc0-246d-45f4-a40c-fc3e57d3e87d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jul 2018 16:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×