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Rhizosphere bacterial communities differ according to fertilizer regimes and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) harvest time, but not aphid herbivory

Rhizosphere bacterial communities differ according to fertilizer regimes and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) harvest time, but not aphid herbivory
Rhizosphere bacterial communities differ according to fertilizer regimes and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) harvest time, but not aphid herbivory
Rhizosphere microbial communities are known to be highly diverse and strongly dependent on various attributes of the host plant, such as species, nutritional status, and growth stage. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been used to characterize the rhizosphere bacterial community of many important crop species, but this is the first study to date to characterize the bacterial and archaeal community of Brassica oleracea var. capitata. The study also tested the response of the bacterial community to fertilizer type (organic or synthetic) and N dosage (high or low), in addition to plant age (9 or 12 weeks) and aphid (Myzus persicae) herbivory (present/absent). The impact of aboveground herbivory on belowground microbial communities has received little attention in the literature, and since the type (organic or mineral) and amount of fertilizer applications are known to affect M. percicae populations, these treatments were applied at agricultural rates to test for synergistic effects on the soil bacterial community. Fertilizer type and plant growth were found to result in significantly different rhizosphere bacterial communities, while there was no effect of aphid herbivory. Several operational taxonomic units were identified as varying significantly in abundance between the treatment groups and age cohorts. These included members of the S-oxidizing genus Thiobacillus, which was significantly more abundant in organically fertilized 12-week-old cabbages, and the N-fixing cyanobacteria Phormidium, which appeared to decline in synthetically fertilized soils relative to controls. These responses may be an effect of accumulating root-derived glucosinolates in the B. oleracea rhizosphere and increased N-availability, respectively.
1664-302X
1-18
O'Brien, Flora J M
cc309847-642d-49d8-a087-624227e529ba
Dumont, Marc G
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Webb, Jeremy S
ec0a5c4e-86cc-4ae9-b390-7298f5d65f8d
Poppy, Guy M
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
O'Brien, Flora J M
cc309847-642d-49d8-a087-624227e529ba
Dumont, Marc G
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Webb, Jeremy S
ec0a5c4e-86cc-4ae9-b390-7298f5d65f8d
Poppy, Guy M
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389

O'Brien, Flora J M, Dumont, Marc G, Webb, Jeremy S and Poppy, Guy M (2018) Rhizosphere bacterial communities differ according to fertilizer regimes and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) harvest time, but not aphid herbivory. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, 1-18. (doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.01620).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rhizosphere microbial communities are known to be highly diverse and strongly dependent on various attributes of the host plant, such as species, nutritional status, and growth stage. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been used to characterize the rhizosphere bacterial community of many important crop species, but this is the first study to date to characterize the bacterial and archaeal community of Brassica oleracea var. capitata. The study also tested the response of the bacterial community to fertilizer type (organic or synthetic) and N dosage (high or low), in addition to plant age (9 or 12 weeks) and aphid (Myzus persicae) herbivory (present/absent). The impact of aboveground herbivory on belowground microbial communities has received little attention in the literature, and since the type (organic or mineral) and amount of fertilizer applications are known to affect M. percicae populations, these treatments were applied at agricultural rates to test for synergistic effects on the soil bacterial community. Fertilizer type and plant growth were found to result in significantly different rhizosphere bacterial communities, while there was no effect of aphid herbivory. Several operational taxonomic units were identified as varying significantly in abundance between the treatment groups and age cohorts. These included members of the S-oxidizing genus Thiobacillus, which was significantly more abundant in organically fertilized 12-week-old cabbages, and the N-fixing cyanobacteria Phormidium, which appeared to decline in synthetically fertilized soils relative to controls. These responses may be an effect of accumulating root-derived glucosinolates in the B. oleracea rhizosphere and increased N-availability, respectively.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 July 2018
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422733
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422733
ISSN: 1664-302X
PURE UUID: dfec8fed-10fd-4f21-9af7-d2f0476e9f5a
ORCID for Marc G Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668
ORCID for Jeremy S Webb: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2068-8589

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

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