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Inclusive school practices supporting the primary to secondary transition for autistic children: pupil, teacher, and parental perspectives

Inclusive school practices supporting the primary to secondary transition for autistic children: pupil, teacher, and parental perspectives
Inclusive school practices supporting the primary to secondary transition for autistic children: pupil, teacher, and parental perspectives
Purpose: The primary to secondary school transition can have a significant and long-lasting impact on young people. Autistic children are particularly vulnerable to negative transition experiences, however, there is a lack of research examining effective practices and provision for these pupils. This case study involves a mainstream secondary school in the South of England, which has a dedicated Learning Support base. The aim was to collect qualitative data on experiences of the primary to secondary school transition from multiple stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach: A photovoice activity followed by a semi-structured interview was conducted with five autistic pupils aged 12-16 years; semi-structured interviews were also carried out with six parents, and four teachers.

Findings: Five key themes emerged from the data in relation to effective practices: Inclusion, Child-centred approach, Familiarisation, Visual Supports, and Communication and Consistency.

Research limitations/implications: As a small-scale case study there are limitations regarding generalisation. However, this research illuminates transition practices that are experienced as effective by autistic children, their families and teachers.

Practical implications: Practical implications related to each of these themes are highlighted. These implications are important in the context of the mandatory responsibilities of schools in England to include the voices of children and young people with special educational needs in decisions about their education.

Originality/value: The findings challenge a rights-based approach to inclusion and illustrate the importance of a needs-based approach which appropriately recognises and understands what autism means for children, their families, and the teachers who support them.
2056-3868
184
Hoy, Keri
584035af-3172-4bf7-b620-bc938bdc221e
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d
Kovshoff, Hanna
82c321ee-d151-40c5-8dde-281af59f2142
Hoy, Keri
584035af-3172-4bf7-b620-bc938bdc221e
Parsons, Sarah
5af3382f-cda3-489c-a336-9604f3c04d7d
Kovshoff, Hanna
82c321ee-d151-40c5-8dde-281af59f2142

Hoy, Keri, Parsons, Sarah and Kovshoff, Hanna (2018) Inclusive school practices supporting the primary to secondary transition for autistic children: pupil, teacher, and parental perspectives. Advances in Autism, 4 (4), 184. (doi:10.1108/AIA-05-2018-0016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: The primary to secondary school transition can have a significant and long-lasting impact on young people. Autistic children are particularly vulnerable to negative transition experiences, however, there is a lack of research examining effective practices and provision for these pupils. This case study involves a mainstream secondary school in the South of England, which has a dedicated Learning Support base. The aim was to collect qualitative data on experiences of the primary to secondary school transition from multiple stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach: A photovoice activity followed by a semi-structured interview was conducted with five autistic pupils aged 12-16 years; semi-structured interviews were also carried out with six parents, and four teachers.

Findings: Five key themes emerged from the data in relation to effective practices: Inclusion, Child-centred approach, Familiarisation, Visual Supports, and Communication and Consistency.

Research limitations/implications: As a small-scale case study there are limitations regarding generalisation. However, this research illuminates transition practices that are experienced as effective by autistic children, their families and teachers.

Practical implications: Practical implications related to each of these themes are highlighted. These implications are important in the context of the mandatory responsibilities of schools in England to include the voices of children and young people with special educational needs in decisions about their education.

Originality/value: The findings challenge a rights-based approach to inclusion and illustrate the importance of a needs-based approach which appropriately recognises and understands what autism means for children, their families, and the teachers who support them.

Text
Hoy et al (accepted) Inclusive practices Advances in Autism - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 August 2018
Published date: November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422763
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422763
ISSN: 2056-3868
PURE UUID: 1fd7d50e-38fc-42fb-bc2e-a754b27dc7e1
ORCID for Sarah Parsons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2542-4745
ORCID for Hanna Kovshoff: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6041-0376

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 04:09

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