The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Screening and management of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy

Screening and management of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy
Screening and management of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy
Hydroxychloroquine is a drug increasingly used in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune disorders. The use of hydroxychloroquine is increasing, with an estimated 11,000 new treatment initiations per year in England and Wales. Modern retinal imaging techniques identify the prevalence of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy at around 7.5% in patients taking the drug for more than 5 years, increasing to 20–50% after 20 years. These data suggest a large patient cohort with detectable pre-symptomatic hydroxychloroquine retinopathy in the United Kingdom who continue to take the medication. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists now recommends annual assessment for patients who are taking hydroxychloroquine for more than 5 years. They also recommend a safe dose as 5 mg/kg per day. A key point is that the doctor prescribing this medication is responsible in ensuring their patient can be adequately screened to avoid complications of the therapy. As such, the onus is on those who prescribe hydroxychloroquine (including general practitioners who re-prescribe it on behalf of consultants) to ensure that the ophthalmic resources are available for screening for long-term complications in their locality.
Hydroxychloroquine, retinopathy
0950-222X
n/a
Lotery, Andrew
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514
Lotery, Andrew
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514

Lotery, Andrew (2018) Screening and management of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Eye, 32, n/a, [32].

Record type: Letter

Abstract

Hydroxychloroquine is a drug increasingly used in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune disorders. The use of hydroxychloroquine is increasing, with an estimated 11,000 new treatment initiations per year in England and Wales. Modern retinal imaging techniques identify the prevalence of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy at around 7.5% in patients taking the drug for more than 5 years, increasing to 20–50% after 20 years. These data suggest a large patient cohort with detectable pre-symptomatic hydroxychloroquine retinopathy in the United Kingdom who continue to take the medication. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists now recommends annual assessment for patients who are taking hydroxychloroquine for more than 5 years. They also recommend a safe dose as 5 mg/kg per day. A key point is that the doctor prescribing this medication is responsible in ensuring their patient can be adequately screened to avoid complications of the therapy. As such, the onus is on those who prescribe hydroxychloroquine (including general practitioners who re-prescribe it on behalf of consultants) to ensure that the ophthalmic resources are available for screening for long-term complications in their locality.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 25 July 2018
Additional Information: Users in the United Kingdom: Executive Summary. Practice Update website.
Keywords: Hydroxychloroquine, retinopathy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422821
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422821
ISSN: 0950-222X
PURE UUID: 00b685f6-ee4f-4802-816b-83e1ffca03d3
ORCID for Andrew Lotery: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5541-4305

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:08

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×