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Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

While pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions are recommended as the primary frontline treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), alternative approaches to managing ADHD are becoming increasingly popular among patients and their families. Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is an example of this. PUFA supplementation is not recommended by guidelines for managing ADHD; however, patients may still decide to use it. To provide direction to healthcare professionals (HCPs) managing ADHD, eight international experts in the field of adult and child ADHD came together for the Continuum Education Board: Omega Supplements in ADHD meeting. This commentary summarises the panel's consensus that current evidence suggests PUFA supplementation has a small beneficial effect on behaviour in children with ADHD, and that further high-quality research is needed to clearly evaluate and define its role in the management of ADHD of children, adolescents and adults. The panel concluded that in cases where patients use PUFA supplementation, HCPs should be comfortable explaining the potential gains that they may have and their possible side effects. The panel also concluded HCPs should not reinforce the idea that PUFA supplementation should replace treatment approaches with a more robust evidence base for managing ADHD.

ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, health, Nutrition, omega, polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA, supplements
0260-1060
1-6
Banaschewski, Tobias
4627c589-04cc-4f5b-ac2d-05f547f63dfd
Belsham, Brendan
acf965ab-c343-4575-9843-e2dc3e560b87
Bloch, Michael H.
b0629a2d-eef2-4dc4-894f-c1d1779db227
Ferrin, Maite
65c4c0b6-2a91-4343-8ef0-688ad2b1ba85
Johnson, Mats
b418cf41-b73c-464c-8641-cf787b8b2818
Kustow, James
dc96359a-059c-4804-b6e6-b39299fbd6aa
Robinson, Sarah
98c11811-e2f2-4cce-afe8-b68376668087
Zuddas, Alessandro
51df7133-8494-4309-902d-bbf088341e46
Banaschewski, Tobias
4627c589-04cc-4f5b-ac2d-05f547f63dfd
Belsham, Brendan
acf965ab-c343-4575-9843-e2dc3e560b87
Bloch, Michael H.
b0629a2d-eef2-4dc4-894f-c1d1779db227
Ferrin, Maite
65c4c0b6-2a91-4343-8ef0-688ad2b1ba85
Johnson, Mats
b418cf41-b73c-464c-8641-cf787b8b2818
Kustow, James
dc96359a-059c-4804-b6e6-b39299fbd6aa
Robinson, Sarah
98c11811-e2f2-4cce-afe8-b68376668087
Zuddas, Alessandro
51df7133-8494-4309-902d-bbf088341e46

Banaschewski, Tobias, Belsham, Brendan, Bloch, Michael H., Ferrin, Maite, Johnson, Mats, Kustow, James, Robinson, Sarah and Zuddas, Alessandro (2018) Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nutrition and Health, 1-6. (doi:10.1177/0260106018772170).

Record type: Article

Abstract

While pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions are recommended as the primary frontline treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), alternative approaches to managing ADHD are becoming increasingly popular among patients and their families. Supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is an example of this. PUFA supplementation is not recommended by guidelines for managing ADHD; however, patients may still decide to use it. To provide direction to healthcare professionals (HCPs) managing ADHD, eight international experts in the field of adult and child ADHD came together for the Continuum Education Board: Omega Supplements in ADHD meeting. This commentary summarises the panel's consensus that current evidence suggests PUFA supplementation has a small beneficial effect on behaviour in children with ADHD, and that further high-quality research is needed to clearly evaluate and define its role in the management of ADHD of children, adolescents and adults. The panel concluded that in cases where patients use PUFA supplementation, HCPs should be comfortable explaining the potential gains that they may have and their possible side effects. The panel also concluded HCPs should not reinforce the idea that PUFA supplementation should replace treatment approaches with a more robust evidence base for managing ADHD.

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0260106018772170
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2018
Keywords: ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, health, Nutrition, omega, polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA, supplements

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422983
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422983
ISSN: 0260-1060
PURE UUID: d422452e-1c27-4268-8678-f43c181b049a

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Date deposited: 09 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:11

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Contributors

Author: Tobias Banaschewski
Author: Brendan Belsham
Author: Michael H. Bloch
Author: Maite Ferrin
Author: Mats Johnson
Author: James Kustow
Author: Sarah Robinson
Author: Alessandro Zuddas

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