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Using microalgae in the circular economy to valorise anaerobic digestate: challenges and opportunities

Using microalgae in the circular economy to valorise anaerobic digestate: challenges and opportunities
Using microalgae in the circular economy to valorise anaerobic digestate: challenges and opportunities
Managing organic waste streams is a major challenge for the agricultural industry. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic wastes is a preferred option in the waste management hierarchy, as this process can generate renewable energy, reduce emissions from waste storage, and produce fertiliser material. However, Nitrate Vulnerable Zone legislation and seasonal restrictions can limit the use of digestate on agricultural land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential of cultivating microalgae on digestate as a feedstock, either directly after dilution, or indirectly from effluent remaining after biofertiliser extraction. Resultant microalgal biomass can then be used to produce livestock feed, biofuel or for higher value bio-products. The approach could mitigate for possible regional excesses, and substitute conventional high-impact products with bio-resources, enhancing sustainability within a circular economy. Recycling nutrients from digestate with algal technology is at an early stage. We present and discuss challenges and opportunities associated with developing this new technology.
0960-8524
1-11
Stiles, William A.v.
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Styles, David
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Chapman, Stephen P.
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Esteves, Sandra
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Bywater, Angela
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Melville, Lynsey
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Silkina, Alla
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Lupatsch, Ingrid
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Fuentes Grünewald, Claudio
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Lovitt, Robert
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Chaloner, Tom
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Bull, Andy
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Morris, Chris
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Llewellyn, Carole A.
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Stiles, William A.v.
174bbcaa-cced-415f-b85b-ca266d84dd44
Styles, David
f4b1aff4-0d71-481a-a998-d6ba44da4d86
Chapman, Stephen P.
041e96ab-8387-4ef8-a629-d5c105ab303c
Esteves, Sandra
f98d7ceb-4ec4-4cbe-ac82-8eff1d10417b
Bywater, Angela
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Melville, Lynsey
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Silkina, Alla
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Lupatsch, Ingrid
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Fuentes Grünewald, Claudio
66ef9a59-7797-47d6-9f87-f998f028e03b
Lovitt, Robert
098e099e-e404-4ca8-84d0-7b5d5c020048
Chaloner, Tom
2108cf3b-5382-4c4f-b527-15072540cddf
Bull, Andy
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Morris, Chris
391c0adc-2bf6-421d-874a-62c4a27fba64
Llewellyn, Carole A.
16d62d11-8ee4-4ab1-a42d-9fad3ef42dbd

Stiles, William A.v., Styles, David, Chapman, Stephen P., Esteves, Sandra, Bywater, Angela, Melville, Lynsey, Silkina, Alla, Lupatsch, Ingrid, Fuentes Grünewald, Claudio, Lovitt, Robert, Chaloner, Tom, Bull, Andy, Morris, Chris and Llewellyn, Carole A. (2018) Using microalgae in the circular economy to valorise anaerobic digestate: challenges and opportunities. Bioresource Technology, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/j.biortech.2018.07.100).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Managing organic waste streams is a major challenge for the agricultural industry. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic wastes is a preferred option in the waste management hierarchy, as this process can generate renewable energy, reduce emissions from waste storage, and produce fertiliser material. However, Nitrate Vulnerable Zone legislation and seasonal restrictions can limit the use of digestate on agricultural land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential of cultivating microalgae on digestate as a feedstock, either directly after dilution, or indirectly from effluent remaining after biofertiliser extraction. Resultant microalgal biomass can then be used to produce livestock feed, biofuel or for higher value bio-products. The approach could mitigate for possible regional excesses, and substitute conventional high-impact products with bio-resources, enhancing sustainability within a circular economy. Recycling nutrients from digestate with algal technology is at an early stage. We present and discuss challenges and opportunities associated with developing this new technology.

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Using microalgae in the circular economy to valorise anaerobic digestate.._ - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423013
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423013
ISSN: 0960-8524
PURE UUID: 52e45550-2bfb-49dd-b9bb-eddcd2d08b0b
ORCID for Angela Bywater: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4437-0316

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Date deposited: 09 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:31

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Contributors

Author: William A.v. Stiles
Author: David Styles
Author: Stephen P. Chapman
Author: Sandra Esteves
Author: Angela Bywater ORCID iD
Author: Lynsey Melville
Author: Alla Silkina
Author: Ingrid Lupatsch
Author: Claudio Fuentes Grünewald
Author: Robert Lovitt
Author: Tom Chaloner
Author: Andy Bull
Author: Chris Morris
Author: Carole A. Llewellyn

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