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Using cognitive work analysis to inform policy recommendations to support fuel-efficient driving

Using cognitive work analysis to inform policy recommendations to support fuel-efficient driving
Using cognitive work analysis to inform policy recommendations to support fuel-efficient driving

The role of man-made emissions in climate change has been a large focus of academic research and political discussion. One considerable source of emissions is everyday driving, and finding ways to reduce driving emissions is a great challenge. This paper presents the use of Cognitive Work Analysis as a potential tool in helping address this problem. Focusing on Control Task Analysis and Social Organization and Cooperation Analysis, this paper discusses the indirect role governmental organizations can play in reducing driving-related emissions. It is proposed that the use of Cognitive Work Analysis can provide insights not typically garnered from traditional academic literature surrounding eco-driving, including the role governmental organizations can play in reducing everyday emissions.

Cognitive Work Analysis, Eco-driving, Human factors
2194-5357
376-385
Springer
Allison, Craig K.
46b3ce37-1986-4a23-9385-a54d0abd08d5
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Allison, Craig K.
46b3ce37-1986-4a23-9385-a54d0abd08d5
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Allison, Craig K. and Stanton, Neville A. (2019) Using cognitive work analysis to inform policy recommendations to support fuel-efficient driving. In Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018. vol. 786, Springer. pp. 376-385 . (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_34).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The role of man-made emissions in climate change has been a large focus of academic research and political discussion. One considerable source of emissions is everyday driving, and finding ways to reduce driving emissions is a great challenge. This paper presents the use of Cognitive Work Analysis as a potential tool in helping address this problem. Focusing on Control Task Analysis and Social Organization and Cooperation Analysis, this paper discusses the indirect role governmental organizations can play in reducing driving-related emissions. It is proposed that the use of Cognitive Work Analysis can provide insights not typically garnered from traditional academic literature surrounding eco-driving, including the role governmental organizations can play in reducing everyday emissions.

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Allison Craig 213 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 28 June 2018
Published date: 2019
Venue - Dates: AHFE International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation, 2018, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Studios, United States, 2018-07-21 - 2018-07-25
Keywords: Cognitive Work Analysis, Eco-driving, Human factors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423074
ISSN: 2194-5357
PURE UUID: 6d3ea5e2-bb2b-4e47-989a-1b14147436cf
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Aug 2018 16:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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