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An alternative floating element design for skin-friction measurement of turbulent wall flows

An alternative floating element design for skin-friction measurement of turbulent wall flows
An alternative floating element design for skin-friction measurement of turbulent wall flows
Indirect methods to estimate surface shear stress are commonly used to characterise rough-wall boundary layer flows. The uncertainty is typically large and often insufficient to carry out quantitative analysis, especially for surface roughness where established scaling and similarity laws may not hold. It is, thus, preferable to rely instead on independent measurement techniques to accurately measure skin friction. The floating element was one of the first to be introduced, and still is the most popular for its features. Although its fundamental principle has remained unchanged, different arrangements have been suggested to overcome its inherent limitations. In this paper, we review some of these designs and further present an alternative that is able to correct for extraneous loads into the drag measurement. Its architecture is based on the parallel-shift linkage, and it features custom built force transducers and a data acquisition system designed to achieve high signal-to-noise ratios. The smooth-wall boundary layer flow is used as a benchmark to assess the accuracy of this balance. Values of skin-friction coefficient show an agreement with hot-wire anemometry to within $2\%$ for $Re_{\theta} = 4\times10^3$ up to $10^4$. A rough surface of staggered distributed cubes with large relative height, $\delta/h\simeq10$, is also investigated. Results indicate the flow reaches the fully rough regime, at the measurement location, for the entire range of Reynolds number. Furthermore, the values of skin friction agree with existing estimations from alternative methods.
Wall shear stress, floating element, uncertainty, roughness
0723-4864
1-15
Amaro Matoso Aguiar Ferreira, Manuel
bdfedfb9-85f6-4dbb-b031-a977cb8f145d
Rodriguez-Lopez, Eduardo
0aef9cc6-1abf-48b6-bafb-e20201b44d6a
Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram
5e69099f-2f39-4fdd-8a85-3ac906827052
Amaro Matoso Aguiar Ferreira, Manuel
bdfedfb9-85f6-4dbb-b031-a977cb8f145d
Rodriguez-Lopez, Eduardo
0aef9cc6-1abf-48b6-bafb-e20201b44d6a
Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram
5e69099f-2f39-4fdd-8a85-3ac906827052

Amaro Matoso Aguiar Ferreira, Manuel, Rodriguez-Lopez, Eduardo and Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram (2018) An alternative floating element design for skin-friction measurement of turbulent wall flows. Experiments in Fluids, 59 (155), 1-15. (doi:10.1007/s00348-018-2612-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Indirect methods to estimate surface shear stress are commonly used to characterise rough-wall boundary layer flows. The uncertainty is typically large and often insufficient to carry out quantitative analysis, especially for surface roughness where established scaling and similarity laws may not hold. It is, thus, preferable to rely instead on independent measurement techniques to accurately measure skin friction. The floating element was one of the first to be introduced, and still is the most popular for its features. Although its fundamental principle has remained unchanged, different arrangements have been suggested to overcome its inherent limitations. In this paper, we review some of these designs and further present an alternative that is able to correct for extraneous loads into the drag measurement. Its architecture is based on the parallel-shift linkage, and it features custom built force transducers and a data acquisition system designed to achieve high signal-to-noise ratios. The smooth-wall boundary layer flow is used as a benchmark to assess the accuracy of this balance. Values of skin-friction coefficient show an agreement with hot-wire anemometry to within $2\%$ for $Re_{\theta} = 4\times10^3$ up to $10^4$. A rough surface of staggered distributed cubes with large relative height, $\delta/h\simeq10$, is also investigated. Results indicate the flow reaches the fully rough regime, at the measurement location, for the entire range of Reynolds number. Furthermore, the values of skin friction agree with existing estimations from alternative methods.

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Ferreira2018 - An alternative floating element design for skin-friction measurement of trubulent wall flows - Accepted Manuscript
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Submitted date: 6 June 2018
Accepted/In Press date: 20 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 September 2018
Published date: October 2018
Keywords: Wall shear stress, floating element, uncertainty, roughness

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423142
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423142
ISSN: 0723-4864
PURE UUID: 8f4c9f76-8a23-4964-ab55-0dfa4af68037
ORCID for Manuel Amaro Matoso Aguiar Ferreira: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2428-0284
ORCID for Eduardo Rodriguez-Lopez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3927-8811
ORCID for Bharathram Ganapathisubramani: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-0486

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Date deposited: 19 Sep 2018 11:04
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:06

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Contributors

Author: Manuel Amaro Matoso Aguiar Ferreira ORCID iD
Author: Eduardo Rodriguez-Lopez ORCID iD

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