The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Strategic attacks on trust models via bandit optimization

Strategic attacks on trust models via bandit optimization
Strategic attacks on trust models via bandit optimization

Trust and reputation systems are designed to mitigate risks associated with decisions to rely upon systems over which there is no direct control. The effectiveness of trust models are typically evaluated against relatively shallow metrics regarding the sophistication of potential attacks. In reality, such systems may be open to strategic attacks, which need to be investigated in-depth if trust model resilience is to be more fully understood. Here, we devise an orchestrated attack strategy for a specific state-of-the-art statistical trust model (HABIT). We evaluate how these intelligent attack strategies can influence predictions of target trustworthiness by this model. Our conjecture is that this approach represents a stronger benchmark for the assessment of trust models in general.

1613-0073
87-95
Güneş, Taha D.
d250eea0-636d-41a8-96c0-a50813e4b780
Tran-Thanh, Long
e0666669-d34b-460e-950d-e8b139fab16c
Norman, Timothy J.
663e522f-807c-4569-9201-dc141c8eb50d
Güneş, Taha D.
d250eea0-636d-41a8-96c0-a50813e4b780
Tran-Thanh, Long
e0666669-d34b-460e-950d-e8b139fab16c
Norman, Timothy J.
663e522f-807c-4569-9201-dc141c8eb50d

Güneş, Taha D., Tran-Thanh, Long and Norman, Timothy J. (2018) Strategic attacks on trust models via bandit optimization. CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2154, 87-95.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Trust and reputation systems are designed to mitigate risks associated with decisions to rely upon systems over which there is no direct control. The effectiveness of trust models are typically evaluated against relatively shallow metrics regarding the sophistication of potential attacks. In reality, such systems may be open to strategic attacks, which need to be investigated in-depth if trust model resilience is to be more fully understood. Here, we devise an orchestrated attack strategy for a specific state-of-the-art statistical trust model (HABIT). We evaluate how these intelligent attack strategies can influence predictions of target trustworthiness by this model. Our conjecture is that this approach represents a stronger benchmark for the assessment of trust models in general.

Text paper8 - Version of Record
Available under License Other.
Download (818kB)

More information

Published date: 14 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423211
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423211
ISSN: 1613-0073
PURE UUID: 70ef5624-71d2-4a6f-9723-edb45ecbd23e
ORCID for Long Tran-Thanh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1617-8316
ORCID for Timothy J. Norman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6387-4034

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 06 Oct 2018 00:33

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×