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Effects of tangential velocity in the reactive relativistic Riemann problem

Effects of tangential velocity in the reactive relativistic Riemann problem
Effects of tangential velocity in the reactive relativistic Riemann problem
Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear burning events which occur on the surfaces of accreting neutron stars. Burning begins in a localised spot in the star's ocean layer before propagating across the entire surface as a deflagration. On the scale of the entire star, the burning front can be thought of as discontinuity. To model this, we investigated the reactive Riemann problem for relativistic deflagrations and detonations and developed a numerical solver. Unlike for the Newtonian Riemann problem, where only the velocity perpendicular to the interface is relevant, in the relativistic case the tangential velocity becomes coupled through the Lorentz factor and can alter the waves present in the solution. We investigated whether a fast tangential velocity may be able to cause a deflagration wave to transition to a detonation. We found that such a transition is possible, but only for tangential velocities that are a significant fraction of the speed of light or for systems already on the verge of transitioning. Consequently, it is highly unlikely that this transition would occur for a burning front in a neutron star ocean.
0004-637X
1-11
Harpole, Alice
d6231d20-174e-4e85-9a09-aa4c5a6dbd2d
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4
Harpole, Alice
d6231d20-174e-4e85-9a09-aa4c5a6dbd2d
Hawke, Ian
fc964672-c794-4260-a972-eaf818e7c9f4

Harpole, Alice and Hawke, Ian (2019) Effects of tangential velocity in the reactive relativistic Riemann problem. The Astrophysical Journal, 884 (2), 1-11. (doi:10.3847/1538-4357/ab40ab).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear burning events which occur on the surfaces of accreting neutron stars. Burning begins in a localised spot in the star's ocean layer before propagating across the entire surface as a deflagration. On the scale of the entire star, the burning front can be thought of as discontinuity. To model this, we investigated the reactive Riemann problem for relativistic deflagrations and detonations and developed a numerical solver. Unlike for the Newtonian Riemann problem, where only the velocity perpendicular to the interface is relevant, in the relativistic case the tangential velocity becomes coupled through the Lorentz factor and can alter the waves present in the solution. We investigated whether a fast tangential velocity may be able to cause a deflagration wave to transition to a detonation. We found that such a transition is possible, but only for tangential velocities that are a significant fraction of the speed of light or for systems already on the verge of transitioning. Consequently, it is highly unlikely that this transition would occur for a burning front in a neutron star ocean.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2018
Published date: 16 October 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423257
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423257
ISSN: 0004-637X
PURE UUID: bb84e3ea-a3aa-4184-a3c2-ff3848629b82
ORCID for Ian Hawke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4805-0309

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Sep 2018 16:31
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:46

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