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Nasal balloon autoinflation for glue ear in primary care: a qualitative interview study

Nasal balloon autoinflation for glue ear in primary care: a qualitative interview study
Nasal balloon autoinflation for glue ear in primary care: a qualitative interview study
Background:
Nasal balloon autoinflation is an effective, non-surgical treatment for symptomatic children with glue ear, although uptake is variable and evidence about acceptability and feasibility is limited.

Aim:
To explore parent and healthcare professional views and experiences of nasal balloon autoinflation for children with glue ear in primary care.

Design and setting
Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with a maximum variety sample of parents, GPs and practice nurses.

Method:
Semi-structured face-to-face and telephone interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results:
14 parents, 31 GPs and 19 nurses were included in the study. Parents described the nasal balloon as a natural, ‘holistic’ treatment that was both acceptable and appealing to children. GPs and nurses perceived the method to be a low cost, low risk strategy, applicable to the primary care setting. Good instruction and demonstration ensured children mastered the technique and engaged with the treatment, but uncertainties were raised about training provision and potential impact on the GP consultation. Making nasal balloon autoinflation part of a child’s daily routine enhances compliance, but difficulties can arise if children are unwell or refuse to cooperate.

Conclusions:
Nasal balloon autoinflation is an acceptable, low cost treatment option for children with glue ear in primary care. Provision of educational materials and demonstration of the method are likely to promote uptake and compliance. Wider use of the nasal balloon has the potential to enhance early management, and may help to fill the management gap arising from forthcoming changes to care pathways.
general practitioners, glue ear, otitis media with effusion, parents, primary care, qualitative research
0960-1643
e24-e32
Vennik, Jane
21da0b2c-3baa-4199-97a9-407b74f8e8f0
Williamson, Ian
12381296-edbf-4ac5-969b-dcb559c22f27
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99
Vennik, Jane
21da0b2c-3baa-4199-97a9-407b74f8e8f0
Williamson, Ian
12381296-edbf-4ac5-969b-dcb559c22f27
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99

Vennik, Jane, Williamson, Ian, Eyles, Caroline, Everitt, Hazel and Moore, Michael (2019) Nasal balloon autoinflation for glue ear in primary care: a qualitative interview study. British Journal of General Practice, 69 (678), e24-e32. (doi:10.3399/bjgp18X700217).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:
Nasal balloon autoinflation is an effective, non-surgical treatment for symptomatic children with glue ear, although uptake is variable and evidence about acceptability and feasibility is limited.

Aim:
To explore parent and healthcare professional views and experiences of nasal balloon autoinflation for children with glue ear in primary care.

Design and setting
Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with a maximum variety sample of parents, GPs and practice nurses.

Method:
Semi-structured face-to-face and telephone interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results:
14 parents, 31 GPs and 19 nurses were included in the study. Parents described the nasal balloon as a natural, ‘holistic’ treatment that was both acceptable and appealing to children. GPs and nurses perceived the method to be a low cost, low risk strategy, applicable to the primary care setting. Good instruction and demonstration ensured children mastered the technique and engaged with the treatment, but uncertainties were raised about training provision and potential impact on the GP consultation. Making nasal balloon autoinflation part of a child’s daily routine enhances compliance, but difficulties can arise if children are unwell or refuse to cooperate.

Conclusions:
Nasal balloon autoinflation is an acceptable, low cost treatment option for children with glue ear in primary care. Provision of educational materials and demonstration of the method are likely to promote uptake and compliance. Wider use of the nasal balloon has the potential to enhance early management, and may help to fill the management gap arising from forthcoming changes to care pathways.

Text
BJGP parent and healthcare professional views - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 December 2018
Published date: January 2019
Keywords: general practitioners, glue ear, otitis media with effusion, parents, primary care, qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423282
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423282
ISSN: 0960-1643
PURE UUID: 8caf4745-d679-4429-8628-aa307bc95d2a
ORCID for Hazel Everitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-8403
ORCID for Michael Moore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5127-4509

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:03

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