The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

A cellular model of the electrical characteristics of skin

A cellular model of the electrical characteristics of skin
A cellular model of the electrical characteristics of skin
The dielectric properties of skin are of particular interest in the fields of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES), diagnostic procedures such as Electrocardiogram and cancer treatment. This thesis is concerned primarily with the effect of hydration and electroporation on skin impedance when signals used in FES are applied. Skin impedance has typically been represented by an equivalent circuit of varying complexities in the literature; however this approach does not incorporate the effects of hydration and electroporation. Alternatives to this include simulation of skin cells undergoing electrical stimulation and direct experimentation either in vitro or in vivo. This thesis aims to expand the current understanding in this field with particular focus on the effects of hydration and electroporation through simulation. The stratum corneum (SC) has the most dominant impact on overall impedance of skin, particularly at low frequencies, and therefore was the focus for all of the simulations.

The models representing individual cells showed strong agreement with experimental data in the literature in terms of their impedance when exposed to a variety of frequencies and input voltages. Expanding these models to include a greater number of cells continued to generate agreement with experimental data from the literature. When the conductivity of the SC cells were altered to represent the effect of hydration, the simulations showed a substantial reduction in impedance from 53kΩ to 27kΩ, which can be represented as a double exponential decay. A further model was produced with a cell membrane conductivity dependent upon the voltage across the membrane to represent the presence of electropores. The results showed that when signals typically used in FES are applied, electropores are formed. The presence of electropores causes a decrease in skin impedance from 76kΩ to 22kΩ.
University of Southampton
Davies, Luke
3b12e757-daa0-4f35-bdcf-9281baad3558
Davies, Luke
3b12e757-daa0-4f35-bdcf-9281baad3558
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
Chen, Guanghui
3de45a9c-6c9a-4bcb-90c3-d7e26be21819
Angus, Charlotte
7a190f2d-9816-4960-8695-e694c39f099c
Melvin, Tracy
fd87f5eb-2bb9-48fa-b7be-7100ace9c50f

Davies, Luke (2018) A cellular model of the electrical characteristics of skin. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 125pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The dielectric properties of skin are of particular interest in the fields of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES), diagnostic procedures such as Electrocardiogram and cancer treatment. This thesis is concerned primarily with the effect of hydration and electroporation on skin impedance when signals used in FES are applied. Skin impedance has typically been represented by an equivalent circuit of varying complexities in the literature; however this approach does not incorporate the effects of hydration and electroporation. Alternatives to this include simulation of skin cells undergoing electrical stimulation and direct experimentation either in vitro or in vivo. This thesis aims to expand the current understanding in this field with particular focus on the effects of hydration and electroporation through simulation. The stratum corneum (SC) has the most dominant impact on overall impedance of skin, particularly at low frequencies, and therefore was the focus for all of the simulations.

The models representing individual cells showed strong agreement with experimental data in the literature in terms of their impedance when exposed to a variety of frequencies and input voltages. Expanding these models to include a greater number of cells continued to generate agreement with experimental data from the literature. When the conductivity of the SC cells were altered to represent the effect of hydration, the simulations showed a substantial reduction in impedance from 53kΩ to 27kΩ, which can be represented as a double exponential decay. A further model was produced with a cell membrane conductivity dependent upon the voltage across the membrane to represent the presence of electropores. The results showed that when signals typically used in FES are applied, electropores are formed. The presence of electropores causes a decrease in skin impedance from 76kΩ to 22kΩ.

Text
Final version - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (3MB)

More information

Published date: May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423466
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423466
PURE UUID: 34573752-250e-405e-8eda-8d75370da809

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 13:24

Export record

Contributors

Author: Luke Davies
Thesis advisor: Paul Chappell
Thesis advisor: Guanghui Chen
Thesis advisor: Charlotte Angus
Thesis advisor: Tracy Melvin

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×