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Helping users adopt and delegate agency to autonomous agents in everyday life

Helping users adopt and delegate agency to autonomous agents in everyday life
Helping users adopt and delegate agency to autonomous agents in everyday life
Autonomous agents are designed to take actions on behalf of users, acting autonomously upon data from sensors or online sources. However, the performance and actions of such agents are liable to uncertainties. As such, the design of interaction mechanisms that enable users to understand the operation of autonomous agents and flexibly delegate or regain control is an open challenge for HCI. Against this background, in this thesis we report on three studies designed to better understand how to help users interact with autonomous agents. In particular, we begin by understanding how people deal with uncertainties when delegating agency to autonomous services. We then examined the impact of different agent-designs and feedback mechanisms, inspired by the factors that encourages people to delegate agency in an everyday setting. Based on our findings, we discuss key implications for the design of future autonomous technologies and the design of interaction mechanisms to help users make the best use of such systems.
University of Southampton
Verame, Jhim Kiel M.
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Verame, Jhim Kiel M.
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Ramchurn, Sarvapali
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Costanza, Enrico
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Garcia Garcia, Pedro
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Verame, Jhim Kiel M. (2018) Helping users adopt and delegate agency to autonomous agents in everyday life. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 122pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Autonomous agents are designed to take actions on behalf of users, acting autonomously upon data from sensors or online sources. However, the performance and actions of such agents are liable to uncertainties. As such, the design of interaction mechanisms that enable users to understand the operation of autonomous agents and flexibly delegate or regain control is an open challenge for HCI. Against this background, in this thesis we report on three studies designed to better understand how to help users interact with autonomous agents. In particular, we begin by understanding how people deal with uncertainties when delegating agency to autonomous services. We then examined the impact of different agent-designs and feedback mechanisms, inspired by the factors that encourages people to delegate agency in an everyday setting. Based on our findings, we discuss key implications for the design of future autonomous technologies and the design of interaction mechanisms to help users make the best use of such systems.

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Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: August 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423558
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423558
PURE UUID: 7d3c1333-5e23-4ab1-b5a5-dfc0282c6944
ORCID for Sarvapali Ramchurn: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9686-4302

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:42

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Contributors

Author: Jhim Kiel M. Verame
Thesis advisor: Sarvapali Ramchurn ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Enrico Costanza
Thesis advisor: Pedro Garcia Garcia

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