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How do facilitators of group programmes for long-term conditions conceptualise self-management support?

How do facilitators of group programmes for long-term conditions conceptualise self-management support?
How do facilitators of group programmes for long-term conditions conceptualise self-management support?

Objectives: Increasing self-management skills in people with long-term conditions is widely advocated in policies and guidelines. Group programmes are a common format; yet, how self-management support objectives are enacted in their delivery is poorly understood. Our aim is to explore the perspectives of group programme facilitators. Methods: We undertook thematic analysis of transcribed data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with health professional facilitators (n = 13) from six diverse self-management support group programmes (of obesity, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Results: Facilitators viewed group programmes as responses to health system pressures, e.g. high patient demand. They focussed on providing in-depth education and instruction on physical health, risks and lifestyle behaviour change and emphasised self-responsibility for behaviour change whilst minimising goal setting and support amongst group participants. There were tensions between facilitators’ professional identity and group leader role. Discussion: Group self-management support programmes may not be realising the broader aspirations advocated in long-term condition policy to support medical, emotional and social aspects of long-term conditions by minimising shared learning, problem solving, building of self-efficacy and goal setting. This suggests a disconnect at implementation. Increasing understandings of theoretical and practical self-management support in group programmes across both implementation and health professional (HCP) training will further the professional skills in this format.

group programme, long-term condition, qualitative, Self-management
1742-3953
1-15
Hughes, Stephen
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Lewis, Sophie
e033d675-061d-4ad4-a57a-95b4ccf4edcd
Willis, Karen
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Rogers, Anne
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Wyke, Sally
ad68c72b-485d-48c4-b083-4eb59e09c79a
Smith, Lorraine
415a2f5e-6bce-4beb-b55d-1e14bc645ce5
Hughes, Stephen
3e14ee79-db73-4e5a-8746-c7f3f30bfd84
Lewis, Sophie
e033d675-061d-4ad4-a57a-95b4ccf4edcd
Willis, Karen
0c02e3e5-6e24-4a75-8a2d-3168eb86b390
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Wyke, Sally
ad68c72b-485d-48c4-b083-4eb59e09c79a
Smith, Lorraine
415a2f5e-6bce-4beb-b55d-1e14bc645ce5

Hughes, Stephen, Lewis, Sophie, Willis, Karen, Rogers, Anne, Wyke, Sally and Smith, Lorraine (2018) How do facilitators of group programmes for long-term conditions conceptualise self-management support? Chronic Illness, 1-15. (doi:10.1177/1742395318792068).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Increasing self-management skills in people with long-term conditions is widely advocated in policies and guidelines. Group programmes are a common format; yet, how self-management support objectives are enacted in their delivery is poorly understood. Our aim is to explore the perspectives of group programme facilitators. Methods: We undertook thematic analysis of transcribed data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with health professional facilitators (n = 13) from six diverse self-management support group programmes (of obesity, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Results: Facilitators viewed group programmes as responses to health system pressures, e.g. high patient demand. They focussed on providing in-depth education and instruction on physical health, risks and lifestyle behaviour change and emphasised self-responsibility for behaviour change whilst minimising goal setting and support amongst group participants. There were tensions between facilitators’ professional identity and group leader role. Discussion: Group self-management support programmes may not be realising the broader aspirations advocated in long-term condition policy to support medical, emotional and social aspects of long-term conditions by minimising shared learning, problem solving, building of self-efficacy and goal setting. This suggests a disconnect at implementation. Increasing understandings of theoretical and practical self-management support in group programmes across both implementation and health professional (HCP) training will further the professional skills in this format.

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Facilitator paper_Chronic Illness Jul2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 August 2018
Keywords: group programme, long-term condition, qualitative, Self-management

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Local EPrints ID: 423576
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423576
ISSN: 1742-3953
PURE UUID: 65842c7e-a7a8-451c-b4bc-37a38d541b2d

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Date deposited: 26 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:35

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Contributors

Author: Stephen Hughes
Author: Sophie Lewis
Author: Karen Willis
Author: Anne Rogers
Author: Sally Wyke
Author: Lorraine Smith

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