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1919 – The Year That Changed China: A New History of the New Culture Movement

1919 – The Year That Changed China: A New History of the New Culture Movement
1919 – The Year That Changed China: A New History of the New Culture Movement
The year 1919 changed Chinese culture radically, but in a way that completely took contemporaries by surprise. At the beginning of the year, even well-informed intellectuals did not anticipate that, for instance, baihua (aprecursor of the modern Chinese language), communism, Hu Shi and Chen Duxiu would become important and famous – all of which was very obvious to them at the end of the year.

Elisabeth Forster traces the precise mechanisms behind this transformation on the basis of a rich variety of sources, including newspapers, personal letters, student essays, advertisements, textbooks and diaries. She proposes a new model for cultural change, which puts intellectual marketing at its core. This book retells the story of the New Culture Movement in light of the diversifi ed and decentered picture of Republican China developed in recent scholarship. It is a lively and ironic narrative about cultural change through academic infi ghting, rumors and conspiracy theories, newspaper stories and intellectuals (hell-)bent on selling agendas through powerful buzzwords.
2511-6096
De Gruyter
Forster, Elisabeth
5b83dcba-7458-48bc-bd25-e2833d542bb4
Forster, Elisabeth
5b83dcba-7458-48bc-bd25-e2833d542bb4

Forster, Elisabeth (2018) 1919 – The Year That Changed China: A New History of the New Culture Movement (Transformations of Modern China, 2), vol. 2, Berlin. De Gruyter, 250pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

The year 1919 changed Chinese culture radically, but in a way that completely took contemporaries by surprise. At the beginning of the year, even well-informed intellectuals did not anticipate that, for instance, baihua (aprecursor of the modern Chinese language), communism, Hu Shi and Chen Duxiu would become important and famous – all of which was very obvious to them at the end of the year.

Elisabeth Forster traces the precise mechanisms behind this transformation on the basis of a rich variety of sources, including newspapers, personal letters, student essays, advertisements, textbooks and diaries. She proposes a new model for cultural change, which puts intellectual marketing at its core. This book retells the story of the New Culture Movement in light of the diversifi ed and decentered picture of Republican China developed in recent scholarship. It is a lively and ironic narrative about cultural change through academic infi ghting, rumors and conspiracy theories, newspaper stories and intellectuals (hell-)bent on selling agendas through powerful buzzwords.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423726
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423726
ISSN: 2511-6096
PURE UUID: 7c6316d5-3355-4137-802f-a8b4bc4108d2

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 03 Jun 2019 16:31

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