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Prokaryotic niche partitioning between suspended and sinking marine particles

Prokaryotic niche partitioning between suspended and sinking marine particles
Prokaryotic niche partitioning between suspended and sinking marine particles
Suspended particles are major organic carbon substrates for heterotrophic microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean (100–1000m). Nonetheless, communities associated with these particles have been overlooked compared to sinking particles, the latter generally considered as main carbon transporters to the deep ocean. This study is the first to differentiate prokaryotic communities associated with suspended and sinking particles, collected with a marine snow catcher at four environmentally distinct stations in the Scotia Sea. Amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed distinct prokaryotic communities associated with the two particle‐types in the mixed‐layer (0–100m) and upper‐mesopelagic zone (mean dissimilarity 42.5 ± 15.2%). Although common remineralising taxa were present within both particle‐types, gammaproteobacterial Pseudomonadales and Vibrionales, and alphaproteobacterial Rhodobacterales were found enriched in sinking particles up to 32‐fold, while Flavobacteriales (Bacteroidetes) favoured suspended particles. We propose that this niche‐partitioning may be driven by organic matter properties found within both particle‐types: K‐strategists, specialised in the degradation of complex organic compounds, thrived on semi‐labile suspended particles, while generalists r‐strategists were adapted to the transient labile organic contents of sinking particles. Differences between the two particle‐associated communities were more pronounced in the mesopelagic than in the surface ocean, likely resulting from exchanges between particle‐pools enabled by the stronger turbulence.
suspended particles, sinking particles, Biological carbon pump, particle-associated, marine microbes
1758-2229
Duret, Manon
e9f43140-067d-45d4-b7ea-68dd432798ea
Lampitt, Richard
dfc3785c-fc7d-41fa-89ee-d0c6e27503ad
Lam, Phyllis
996aef80-a15d-4827-aed8-1b97b378f6ad
Duret, Manon
e9f43140-067d-45d4-b7ea-68dd432798ea
Lampitt, Richard
dfc3785c-fc7d-41fa-89ee-d0c6e27503ad
Lam, Phyllis
996aef80-a15d-4827-aed8-1b97b378f6ad

Duret, Manon, Lampitt, Richard and Lam, Phyllis (2018) Prokaryotic niche partitioning between suspended and sinking marine particles. Environmental Microbiology Reports. (doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12692).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Suspended particles are major organic carbon substrates for heterotrophic microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean (100–1000m). Nonetheless, communities associated with these particles have been overlooked compared to sinking particles, the latter generally considered as main carbon transporters to the deep ocean. This study is the first to differentiate prokaryotic communities associated with suspended and sinking particles, collected with a marine snow catcher at four environmentally distinct stations in the Scotia Sea. Amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed distinct prokaryotic communities associated with the two particle‐types in the mixed‐layer (0–100m) and upper‐mesopelagic zone (mean dissimilarity 42.5 ± 15.2%). Although common remineralising taxa were present within both particle‐types, gammaproteobacterial Pseudomonadales and Vibrionales, and alphaproteobacterial Rhodobacterales were found enriched in sinking particles up to 32‐fold, while Flavobacteriales (Bacteroidetes) favoured suspended particles. We propose that this niche‐partitioning may be driven by organic matter properties found within both particle‐types: K‐strategists, specialised in the degradation of complex organic compounds, thrived on semi‐labile suspended particles, while generalists r‐strategists were adapted to the transient labile organic contents of sinking particles. Differences between the two particle‐associated communities were more pronounced in the mesopelagic than in the surface ocean, likely resulting from exchanges between particle‐pools enabled by the stronger turbulence.

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Duret et al 2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 September 2018
Keywords: suspended particles, sinking particles, Biological carbon pump, particle-associated, marine microbes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423751
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423751
ISSN: 1758-2229
PURE UUID: 3ecf5ad9-7ec9-4b65-a46c-143a76d96cab
ORCID for Manon Duret: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0922-4372
ORCID for Phyllis Lam: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2067-171X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:34

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