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Inertial impact tests to identify the plastic properties of metals

Inertial impact tests to identify the plastic properties of metals
Inertial impact tests to identify the plastic properties of metals

The behavior and failure mechanisms of materials often change at high strain rates (> 100 1/s) when compared with their quasi-static response. These differences are critical when designing structures or components that will be subjected to impact or blast loads. The recent progress in ultra-high speed imaging and full-field measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to improve the quality of high strain rate test data. The objective of the current work is to design and validate an experimental technique to identify the elastoplastic material properties of metals. The methodology uses an ultra-high speed camera and the grid method to obtain time-resolved full-field deformation data as impact induced stress waves propagate in a sample. The virtual fields method is then used to inversely identify the plastic properties of the specimen. The results for five aluminum 6082-T6 impacted at 50 m/s are presented.

EDP Sciences
Davis, Frances
20f89066-bbac-42dc-908d-d89a747dc399
Fletcher, Lloyd
48dca64b-f93c-4655-9205-eaf4e74be90c
Pierron, Fabrice
a1fb4a70-6f34-4625-bc23-fcb6996b79b4
Davis, Frances
20f89066-bbac-42dc-908d-d89a747dc399
Fletcher, Lloyd
48dca64b-f93c-4655-9205-eaf4e74be90c
Pierron, Fabrice
a1fb4a70-6f34-4625-bc23-fcb6996b79b4

Davis, Frances, Fletcher, Lloyd and Pierron, Fabrice (2018) Inertial impact tests to identify the plastic properties of metals. In DYMAT 2018 - 12th International Conference on the Mechanical and Physical Behaviour of Materials under Dynamic Loading. vol. 183, EDP Sciences.. (doi:10.1051/epjconf/201818302051).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The behavior and failure mechanisms of materials often change at high strain rates (> 100 1/s) when compared with their quasi-static response. These differences are critical when designing structures or components that will be subjected to impact or blast loads. The recent progress in ultra-high speed imaging and full-field measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to improve the quality of high strain rate test data. The objective of the current work is to design and validate an experimental technique to identify the elastoplastic material properties of metals. The methodology uses an ultra-high speed camera and the grid method to obtain time-resolved full-field deformation data as impact induced stress waves propagate in a sample. The virtual fields method is then used to inversely identify the plastic properties of the specimen. The results for five aluminum 6082-T6 impacted at 50 m/s are presented.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 September 2018
Venue - Dates: 12th International Conference on the Mechanical and Physical Behaviour of Materials under Dynamic Loading, DYMAT 2018, Arcachon, France, 2018-09-09 - 2018-09-14

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423808
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423808
PURE UUID: 416da541-dff9-4e4f-98bd-b91f9806833b
ORCID for Fabrice Pierron: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2813-4994

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:47

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Contributors

Author: Frances Davis
Author: Lloyd Fletcher
Author: Fabrice Pierron ORCID iD

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