The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

One-step formation of three-dimensional macroporous bacterial sponges as a novel approach for the preparation of bioreactors for bioremediation and green treatment of water

One-step formation of three-dimensional macroporous bacterial sponges as a novel approach for the preparation of bioreactors for bioremediation and green treatment of water
One-step formation of three-dimensional macroporous bacterial sponges as a novel approach for the preparation of bioreactors for bioremediation and green treatment of water
Immobilisation of bacteria on or into a polymer support is a common method for the utilisation of bacteria as biocatalysts for many biotechnological, medical and environmental applications. The main challenge in this approach is the time taken for the formation of stable biofilms, and the typically low percentage of bacterial cells present on or in the polymer matrix. In this work we propose a novel method for producing a porous bacteria based structure with the properties of a sponge (bacterial sponge) that we then use as a bioreactor for water treatment. Cryogelation has been used as a tool to create macroporous (i.e. with pores in the range 10–100 μm), highly permeable systems with low diffusion constraints and high bacterial content (more than 98% to total material content). A novel crosslinking system was used to form stable bacterial sponges with a high percentage of live bacteria organized in a 3D porous structure. The bacterial sponge was produced in a one step process and can be made from one or several bacterial strains (in this case, two bacterial strains Pseudomonas mendocina and Rhodoccocus koreensis (and a mixture of both) were used). Reduction of the total polymer content to 2% makes the system more sustainable and environmentally friendly under disposal as it can be simply composted. The bacterial sponges have good mechanical stability and cell viability, which enables repeated use of the materials for phenol degradation for up to five weeks. The material can be stored and transported in cryogenic conditions (−80 °C) for prolonged periods of time, retaining its bioremediation activity following 4–6 weeks of frozen storage. The proposed method of producing bioreactors with a high number of live immobilised bacteria, low polymer content and controlled 3D structure is a promising tool for developing novel materials based on active bacterial cells for various environmental, biotechnological, biological and medical applications.
2046-2069
30813-30824
Al-Jwaid, Areej K.
b475c4a9-076f-4515-9810-70c1fa322ce4
Berillo, Dmitriy
74baad33-3b75-47bb-8713-f0b321a759d1
Savina, Irina N.
5e5c7acd-71ef-4fb3-baaf-0b98fec91845
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Caplin, Jonathan L.
ec0c90c2-a7af-49da-af6f-d139a42cb631
Al-Jwaid, Areej K.
b475c4a9-076f-4515-9810-70c1fa322ce4
Berillo, Dmitriy
74baad33-3b75-47bb-8713-f0b321a759d1
Savina, Irina N.
5e5c7acd-71ef-4fb3-baaf-0b98fec91845
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Caplin, Jonathan L.
ec0c90c2-a7af-49da-af6f-d139a42cb631

Al-Jwaid, Areej K., Berillo, Dmitriy, Savina, Irina N., Cundy, Andrew B. and Caplin, Jonathan L. (2018) One-step formation of three-dimensional macroporous bacterial sponges as a novel approach for the preparation of bioreactors for bioremediation and green treatment of water. RSC Advances, 8 (54), 30813-30824. (doi:10.1039/C8RA04219E).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Immobilisation of bacteria on or into a polymer support is a common method for the utilisation of bacteria as biocatalysts for many biotechnological, medical and environmental applications. The main challenge in this approach is the time taken for the formation of stable biofilms, and the typically low percentage of bacterial cells present on or in the polymer matrix. In this work we propose a novel method for producing a porous bacteria based structure with the properties of a sponge (bacterial sponge) that we then use as a bioreactor for water treatment. Cryogelation has been used as a tool to create macroporous (i.e. with pores in the range 10–100 μm), highly permeable systems with low diffusion constraints and high bacterial content (more than 98% to total material content). A novel crosslinking system was used to form stable bacterial sponges with a high percentage of live bacteria organized in a 3D porous structure. The bacterial sponge was produced in a one step process and can be made from one or several bacterial strains (in this case, two bacterial strains Pseudomonas mendocina and Rhodoccocus koreensis (and a mixture of both) were used). Reduction of the total polymer content to 2% makes the system more sustainable and environmentally friendly under disposal as it can be simply composted. The bacterial sponges have good mechanical stability and cell viability, which enables repeated use of the materials for phenol degradation for up to five weeks. The material can be stored and transported in cryogenic conditions (−80 °C) for prolonged periods of time, retaining its bioremediation activity following 4–6 weeks of frozen storage. The proposed method of producing bioreactors with a high number of live immobilised bacteria, low polymer content and controlled 3D structure is a promising tool for developing novel materials based on active bacterial cells for various environmental, biotechnological, biological and medical applications.

Text
c8ra04219e - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423834
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423834
ISSN: 2046-2069
PURE UUID: f28c6eea-2e44-49c6-9d54-8caae8cb938d
ORCID for Andrew B. Cundy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4368-2569

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:32

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Areej K. Al-Jwaid
Author: Dmitriy Berillo
Author: Irina N. Savina
Author: Andrew B. Cundy ORCID iD
Author: Jonathan L. Caplin

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×