The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Alley-cropping system can boost arthropod biodiversity and ecosystem functions in oil palm plantations

Alley-cropping system can boost arthropod biodiversity and ecosystem functions in oil palm plantations
Alley-cropping system can boost arthropod biodiversity and ecosystem functions in oil palm plantations

Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is among the fastest expanding crops, due to high global demand for vegetable oils. Large areas of forest are converted into oil palm plantation to meet the market demand in producing countries which causes rapid decline in tropical biodiversity, including arthropods. The alley-cropping system has the potential to promote faunal biodiversity, related ecosystem services and food security in agricultural landscapes. In alley-cropping, a main crop is intercropped with a secondary crop (often a food crop), secondary crops are cultivated in the alleys in between the main crop. We compared arthropod taxonomic richness, arthropod predators and decomposers between five alley-cropping treatments (pineapple, bamboo, black pepper, cacao, bactris), where oil palm is intercropped with another species. In addition, we sampled two control treatments: monoculture oil palm, aged seven and 15 years old. A total of 50,155 arthropod individuals were recorded using pitfall trap sampling, representing 19 orders and 28 families. Fourteen orders belonging to sub-phylum Insecta, three orders from Arachnida (Araneae; Acarinae; Scorpiones) and two orders from Myriapoda (Chordeumatida; Geophilomorpha). We detected an increase in beta-diversity of oil palm production landscape. Specifically, we found that the number of arthropod orders, families and abundance were significantly greater in alley-cropping farming plots than those in monoculture plots. In addition, alley-cropping treatments contained larger numbers of predators and decomposers. Our findings suggest that the alley-cropping system can become a key management strategy to improve biodiversity and ecosystem functions within oil palm production landscapes.

Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Conservation, Insects, Monoculture, Oil palm
0167-8809
19-26
Ashraf, Mohamad
efc4a1c7-ed57-4570-acc4-6bc6247acd04
Zulkifli, Raja
dfe2be42-09c5-4210-9a32-0149014c800f
Sanusi, Ruzana
0e78fd89-5d41-4df3-9d51-b98a080b7e42
Tohiran, Kamil A.
782cdee8-f973-4a48-b53d-dada7135dd1e
Terhem, Razak
a94b2d78-afdb-4f73-abc3-1b3d23d71152
Moslim, Ramle
2bcb9834-89d1-4c55-bac3-ca7ef8ef1017
Norhisham, Ahmad R.
78e1e40e-a73b-4c83-b9b1-33ce488525a8
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Azhar, Badrul
1b729d4a-a1a3-4a11-beab-9cf3a9cbaf4c
Ashraf, Mohamad
efc4a1c7-ed57-4570-acc4-6bc6247acd04
Zulkifli, Raja
dfe2be42-09c5-4210-9a32-0149014c800f
Sanusi, Ruzana
0e78fd89-5d41-4df3-9d51-b98a080b7e42
Tohiran, Kamil A.
782cdee8-f973-4a48-b53d-dada7135dd1e
Terhem, Razak
a94b2d78-afdb-4f73-abc3-1b3d23d71152
Moslim, Ramle
2bcb9834-89d1-4c55-bac3-ca7ef8ef1017
Norhisham, Ahmad R.
78e1e40e-a73b-4c83-b9b1-33ce488525a8
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Azhar, Badrul
1b729d4a-a1a3-4a11-beab-9cf3a9cbaf4c

Ashraf, Mohamad, Zulkifli, Raja, Sanusi, Ruzana, Tohiran, Kamil A., Terhem, Razak, Moslim, Ramle, Norhisham, Ahmad R., Ashton-Butt, Adham and Azhar, Badrul (2018) Alley-cropping system can boost arthropod biodiversity and ecosystem functions in oil palm plantations. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 260, 19-26. (doi:10.1016/j.agee.2018.03.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is among the fastest expanding crops, due to high global demand for vegetable oils. Large areas of forest are converted into oil palm plantation to meet the market demand in producing countries which causes rapid decline in tropical biodiversity, including arthropods. The alley-cropping system has the potential to promote faunal biodiversity, related ecosystem services and food security in agricultural landscapes. In alley-cropping, a main crop is intercropped with a secondary crop (often a food crop), secondary crops are cultivated in the alleys in between the main crop. We compared arthropod taxonomic richness, arthropod predators and decomposers between five alley-cropping treatments (pineapple, bamboo, black pepper, cacao, bactris), where oil palm is intercropped with another species. In addition, we sampled two control treatments: monoculture oil palm, aged seven and 15 years old. A total of 50,155 arthropod individuals were recorded using pitfall trap sampling, representing 19 orders and 28 families. Fourteen orders belonging to sub-phylum Insecta, three orders from Arachnida (Araneae; Acarinae; Scorpiones) and two orders from Myriapoda (Chordeumatida; Geophilomorpha). We detected an increase in beta-diversity of oil palm production landscape. Specifically, we found that the number of arthropod orders, families and abundance were significantly greater in alley-cropping farming plots than those in monoculture plots. In addition, alley-cropping treatments contained larger numbers of predators and decomposers. Our findings suggest that the alley-cropping system can become a key management strategy to improve biodiversity and ecosystem functions within oil palm production landscapes.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2018
Published date: 1 June 2018
Keywords: Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Conservation, Insects, Monoculture, Oil palm

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424104
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424104
ISSN: 0167-8809
PURE UUID: 0a8c1fb8-a10b-4293-9610-0744144ff1d4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 05 Mar 2019 17:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×