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Objectively confirmed prevalence of sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder in pre-school children

Objectively confirmed prevalence of sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder in pre-school children
Objectively confirmed prevalence of sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder in pre-school children
Objective

Childhood sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder (RMD) (ie, sleep-related repetitive movements involving large muscle groups) can impair sleep quality, cause local injury, and disturb household members. Previous parental reports indicate prevalence rates in children under three years of age between 5.5 and 67%. We studied the prevalence of RMD with objective home videosomnography.

Methods

Parents of 707 children having their one-year routine health check (357 male), 740 children having their two-year health check (395 male), and 17 children of unknown age (nine male), were asked if their child showed sleep-related rhythmic movements. If telephone interview confirmed likely RMD, parents completed a standardised clinical questionnaire and three nights of home videosomnography.

Results

At the one-year health check, 31/707 possible cases of RMD were identified [maximal prevalence: 4.38%; 95% CI (2.81, 5.89)] compared to 11/740 at the two-year check [maximal prevalence: 1.49%, 95% CI (0.61, 2.36)]. Of 42 possible cases, nine had resolved; 14 were uncontactable, or did not wish to participate, and four did not complete the study protocol. In four of 10 remaining one-year olds and four of five remaining two-year olds parental report was objectively confirmed by videosomnography. Minimal prevalence based on objective observation was therefore 0.28% [95% CI (0.08, 1.30)] at one-year check and 0.41% [95% CI (0.08, 1.24)] at two-year check.

Conclusions

Prevalence of RMD in a large population of infants and toddlers was lower than previously reported (maximum prevalence 2.87%, minimum prevalence 0.34%). It is important to confirm parental report using objective measures.
1389-9457
16-21
Gogo, Emily
382a324c-a082-4905-ab0a-1228b7df7163
van Sluijs, Rachel
06c50e3d-5d79-4af0-aebf-e61bff0d068c
Cheung, Trevor
3cc498ca-060e-4845-8d36-8a85951c1d41
Gaskell, Chloe
183cd4cd-bba3-4bdb-8ba0-4b2c174534db
Jones, Liam
52433d2f-114d-47bd-a8a2-de40d34549cc
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Hill, Catherine
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Gogo, Emily
382a324c-a082-4905-ab0a-1228b7df7163
van Sluijs, Rachel
06c50e3d-5d79-4af0-aebf-e61bff0d068c
Cheung, Trevor
3cc498ca-060e-4845-8d36-8a85951c1d41
Gaskell, Chloe
183cd4cd-bba3-4bdb-8ba0-4b2c174534db
Jones, Liam
52433d2f-114d-47bd-a8a2-de40d34549cc
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Hill, Catherine
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d

Gogo, Emily, van Sluijs, Rachel, Cheung, Trevor, Gaskell, Chloe, Jones, Liam, Alwan, Nisreen and Hill, Catherine (2019) Objectively confirmed prevalence of sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder in pre-school children. Sleep Medicine, 53, 16-21. (doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2018.08.021).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective

Childhood sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder (RMD) (ie, sleep-related repetitive movements involving large muscle groups) can impair sleep quality, cause local injury, and disturb household members. Previous parental reports indicate prevalence rates in children under three years of age between 5.5 and 67%. We studied the prevalence of RMD with objective home videosomnography.

Methods

Parents of 707 children having their one-year routine health check (357 male), 740 children having their two-year health check (395 male), and 17 children of unknown age (nine male), were asked if their child showed sleep-related rhythmic movements. If telephone interview confirmed likely RMD, parents completed a standardised clinical questionnaire and three nights of home videosomnography.

Results

At the one-year health check, 31/707 possible cases of RMD were identified [maximal prevalence: 4.38%; 95% CI (2.81, 5.89)] compared to 11/740 at the two-year check [maximal prevalence: 1.49%, 95% CI (0.61, 2.36)]. Of 42 possible cases, nine had resolved; 14 were uncontactable, or did not wish to participate, and four did not complete the study protocol. In four of 10 remaining one-year olds and four of five remaining two-year olds parental report was objectively confirmed by videosomnography. Minimal prevalence based on objective observation was therefore 0.28% [95% CI (0.08, 1.30)] at one-year check and 0.41% [95% CI (0.08, 1.24)] at two-year check.

Conclusions

Prevalence of RMD in a large population of infants and toddlers was lower than previously reported (maximum prevalence 2.87%, minimum prevalence 0.34%). It is important to confirm parental report using objective measures.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 September 2018
Published date: January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424119
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424119
ISSN: 1389-9457
PURE UUID: cdd9120c-7b57-4f45-b002-4c3e212d9d08
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463
ORCID for Catherine Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:10

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Contributors

Author: Emily Gogo
Author: Rachel van Sluijs
Author: Trevor Cheung
Author: Chloe Gaskell
Author: Liam Jones
Author: Nisreen Alwan ORCID iD
Author: Catherine Hill ORCID iD

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