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Ontogenetic partial migration is associated with environmental drivers and influences fisheries interactions in a marine predator

Ontogenetic partial migration is associated with environmental drivers and influences fisheries interactions in a marine predator
Ontogenetic partial migration is associated with environmental drivers and influences fisheries interactions in a marine predator

The ability to predict animal movement based on environmental change is essential for understanding the dynamic nature of their spatial ecology, and in turn the effectiveness of conservation strategies. We used a large marine predator that displays partial migration (the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) as a model to test the role of oceanic conditions in predicting the space-use of different size classes. By using generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs), we revealed that environmental variables (sea surface temperature, primary productivity, thermal fronts, and bathymetry) had much greater predictive power for the movements of large, migratory tiger sharks than for small, resident individuals. We also found that coverage of tiger shark movements within "shark sanctuaries" (protected areas specifically for sharks) in the northwest Atlantic could be increased from 12 to 52% through inclusion of Bermudas waters. However, as large tiger sharks are migratory, over 80% of potential longline fisheries interactions would still occur outside the boundaries of even the expanded protected areas. This emphasises that management of highly migratory species needs to be dynamic and account for changing interactions with fisheries over time, which in a changing climate may rely on predicting movements based on oceanic conditions to be effective.

Animal telemetry, conservation, environment, fisheries, foraging, Galeocerdo cuvier, migration, modelling
1054-3139
1383-1392
Lea, James S.E.
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Wetherbee, Bradley M.
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Sousa, Lara L.
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Aming, Choy
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Burnie, Neil
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Humphries, Nicolas E.
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Queiroz, Nuno
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Harvey, Guy M.
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Sims, David W.
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Shivji, Mahmood S.
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Lea, James S.E.
ed55a87b-ba39-4475-a7cb-2ab7fe176620
Wetherbee, Bradley M.
cee3a705-eb60-4815-ae8f-d1f3fa3aed4a
Sousa, Lara L.
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Aming, Choy
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Burnie, Neil
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Humphries, Nicolas E.
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Queiroz, Nuno
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Harvey, Guy M.
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Sims, David W.
7234b444-25e2-4bd5-8348-a1c142d0cf81
Shivji, Mahmood S.
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Lea, James S.E., Wetherbee, Bradley M., Sousa, Lara L., Aming, Choy, Burnie, Neil, Humphries, Nicolas E., Queiroz, Nuno, Harvey, Guy M., Sims, David W. and Shivji, Mahmood S. (2018) Ontogenetic partial migration is associated with environmental drivers and influences fisheries interactions in a marine predator. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 75 (4), 1383-1392. (doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsx238).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The ability to predict animal movement based on environmental change is essential for understanding the dynamic nature of their spatial ecology, and in turn the effectiveness of conservation strategies. We used a large marine predator that displays partial migration (the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) as a model to test the role of oceanic conditions in predicting the space-use of different size classes. By using generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs), we revealed that environmental variables (sea surface temperature, primary productivity, thermal fronts, and bathymetry) had much greater predictive power for the movements of large, migratory tiger sharks than for small, resident individuals. We also found that coverage of tiger shark movements within "shark sanctuaries" (protected areas specifically for sharks) in the northwest Atlantic could be increased from 12 to 52% through inclusion of Bermudas waters. However, as large tiger sharks are migratory, over 80% of potential longline fisheries interactions would still occur outside the boundaries of even the expanded protected areas. This emphasises that management of highly migratory species needs to be dynamic and account for changing interactions with fisheries over time, which in a changing climate may rely on predicting movements based on oceanic conditions to be effective.

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Lea 2018 tiger shark migration ontogeny - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 January 2018
Published date: 1 July 2018
Keywords: Animal telemetry, conservation, environment, fisheries, foraging, Galeocerdo cuvier, migration, modelling

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424120
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424120
ISSN: 1054-3139
PURE UUID: 07494791-eb21-474a-961f-0e7528756391

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Date deposited: 04 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Jun 2022 04:01

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Contributors

Author: James S.E. Lea
Author: Bradley M. Wetherbee
Author: Lara L. Sousa
Author: Choy Aming
Author: Neil Burnie
Author: Nicolas E. Humphries
Author: Nuno Queiroz
Author: Guy M. Harvey
Author: David W. Sims
Author: Mahmood S. Shivji

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