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Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study

Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study
Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study

BACKGROUND: Clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC) is often recommended for people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

OBJECTIVE: To determine the variables that affect continuation or discontinuation of the use of CIC.

METHODS: A three-part mixed-method study (prospective longitudinal cohort ( n = 56), longitudinal qualitative interviews ( n = 20) and retrospective survey ( n = 456)) was undertaken, which identified the variables that influenced CIC continuation/discontinuation. The potential explanatory variables investigated in each study were the individual's age, gender, social circumstances, number of urinary tract infections, bladder symptoms, presence of co-morbidity, stage of multiple sclerosis and years since diagnosis, as well as CIC teaching method and intensity.

RESULTS: For some people with MS the prospect of undertaking CIC is difficult and may take a period of time to accept before beginning the process of using CIC. Ongoing support from clinicians, support at home and a perceived improvement in symptoms such as nocturia were positive predictors of continuation. In many cases, the development of a urinary tract infection during the early stages of CIC use had a significant detrimental impact on continuation.

CONCLUSION: Procedures for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infection during the learning period (i.e. when being taught and becoming competent) should be considered, as well as the development of a tool to aid identification of a person's readiness to try CIC.

Journal Article
1352-4585
727-739
McClurg, Doreen
6a540653-5dc0-4815-89ab-5a40ddde1fea
Bugge, Carol
837b51c1-579b-4590-9feb-ff7645a68865
Elders, Andrew
f82e20bf-ea3b-4aff-aeb4-c149e11def60
Irshad, Tasneem
c3ca6c53-f093-4503-8f8b-ecd8b27c8365
Hagen, Suzanne
60c90fd0-4e79-4685-9ab8-3e26e9e2c642
Moore, Katherine N
a579bf99-6450-4185-98fa-bf15c8478eef
Buckley, Brian
59bb370e-0d92-4b17-9ce1-519f8f7e8739
Fader, Mandy
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277
McClurg, Doreen
6a540653-5dc0-4815-89ab-5a40ddde1fea
Bugge, Carol
837b51c1-579b-4590-9feb-ff7645a68865
Elders, Andrew
f82e20bf-ea3b-4aff-aeb4-c149e11def60
Irshad, Tasneem
c3ca6c53-f093-4503-8f8b-ecd8b27c8365
Hagen, Suzanne
60c90fd0-4e79-4685-9ab8-3e26e9e2c642
Moore, Katherine N
a579bf99-6450-4185-98fa-bf15c8478eef
Buckley, Brian
59bb370e-0d92-4b17-9ce1-519f8f7e8739
Fader, Mandy
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277

McClurg, Doreen, Bugge, Carol, Elders, Andrew, Irshad, Tasneem, Hagen, Suzanne, Moore, Katherine N, Buckley, Brian and Fader, Mandy (2019) Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 25 (5), 727-739. (doi:10.1177/1352458518768722).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC) is often recommended for people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

OBJECTIVE: To determine the variables that affect continuation or discontinuation of the use of CIC.

METHODS: A three-part mixed-method study (prospective longitudinal cohort ( n = 56), longitudinal qualitative interviews ( n = 20) and retrospective survey ( n = 456)) was undertaken, which identified the variables that influenced CIC continuation/discontinuation. The potential explanatory variables investigated in each study were the individual's age, gender, social circumstances, number of urinary tract infections, bladder symptoms, presence of co-morbidity, stage of multiple sclerosis and years since diagnosis, as well as CIC teaching method and intensity.

RESULTS: For some people with MS the prospect of undertaking CIC is difficult and may take a period of time to accept before beginning the process of using CIC. Ongoing support from clinicians, support at home and a perceived improvement in symptoms such as nocturia were positive predictors of continuation. In many cases, the development of a urinary tract infection during the early stages of CIC use had a significant detrimental impact on continuation.

CONCLUSION: Procedures for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infection during the learning period (i.e. when being taught and becoming competent) should be considered, as well as the development of a tool to aid identification of a person's readiness to try CIC.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 April 2018
Published date: 1 April 2019
Keywords: Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424226
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424226
ISSN: 1352-4585
PURE UUID: 4c568247-1334-4a13-91ec-0a7d89e526e3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:35
Last modified: 21 May 2019 16:30

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